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Reasons for Relocating to Fort Lauderdale, FL

Relocating to Fort Lauderdale

  1. What Makes Fort Lauderdale So Charming?
  2. Climate Patterns of Fort Lauderdale
  3. Enjoy Endless Local and Tourist Attractions
  4. To Yacht or Not?
  5. Become a Fort Lauderdale Foodie
  6. What's the Vibe Like?
  7. Is Fort Lauderdale Family Friendly?
  8. Balance Your Finances
  9. Before You Make the Big Move
  10. Make Moving to Fort Lauderdale Fun!

1. What Makes Fort Lauderdale So Charming? 

Fort Lauderdale is a fantastic place to move. Not far from Florida’s popular Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale boasts a more laid back atmosphere as well as a far different combination of people. The city is bustling with natural waterways, valuable real estate, and artists who love to display their work to the public. There’s also an array of restaurants and shops along the water, where residents can soak up some sun while shopping for the perfect sundress. Fort Lauderdale is also home to the white sand beaches that Florida has become famous for. These are all reasons, among others, explaining why someone may want to move to Fort Lauderdale or perhaps other popular cities in Florida, like Miami for instance.  

2. Climate Patterns of Fort Lauderdale

Miles and miles of oceanfront relaxation await all residents and the weather is fantastic year round. The tropical climate allows for plentiful sunshine, which means relatively high temperatures all year long. Although, there is enough diversity in the weather for you not to get tired of the sunshine. Quick patterns of rain quench the region with much-needed water, keeping plants alive and fresh. There is a beautiful coral reef system just off the coast that supports an underwater ecosystem of different fish species and other aquatic life forms. Many natural parks feature hiking trails, picnic areas, and lagoons.

The weather is not ALWAYS forgiving, however. As we talked about before, there are patches of rain that frequent the area. The tropical climate means that hurricanes are rather common as well. Summer and fall months are typically the height of the hurricane season when hot and cold fronts converge in the waters near Fort Lauderdale.

3. Enjoy Endless Local and Tourist Attractions

Residents can enjoy vacation-like activities year round. Moving to Fort Lauderdale means that you can go kayaking in the clear waters, snorkeling in the bays, and fishing in the rivers while enjoying the beautiful weather that is perfect for outdoor activities. While all of this sounds fantastic, there is actually a lot more to the region than just bright sunny weather and outdoor fun. With a population of just 170,000, Fort Lauderdale is a nice place to move if you want to enjoy a rather tight-knit community. Everyone here is joined by their love for beautiful weather and vibrant coastal culture. The city is not short on trendiness, though. The whole city feels like one big beach town, while also keeping up the illusion of being a yachting capital and trendsetting town. All of these personalities come together to create a Florida experience unlike any other. Local business growth has come from restrictions the local jurisdictions have placed on vendors. A more controlled business scene has allowed for phenomenal economic growth in recent years.

4. To Yacht or Not?

The city definitely enjoys and accepts their coastal culture. Want to hear a fun and crazy statistic? Nearly 41,000 residents of Fort Lauderdale live on their own private yachts. Many people call Fort Lauderdale the ‘Venice of America’ because of its multiple bridges and hundreds of miles of waterways. The ports near Fort Lauderdale are among the business in the world when it comes to cruise ship traffic.

5. Become a Fort Lauderdale Foodie

Foodies can rejoice as well, thanks to Fort Lauderdale’s diverse restaurant scene. Residents are exposed to a wide array of restaurants, whether it be a beach dive, casual oceanfront restaurant, or premier seafood establishment, there is something for everybody to enjoy.

Although there is plenty of food to be enjoyed, many of Fort Lauderdale’s residents value living a healthy lifestyle. The lovely tropical climate means that residents can go for a bike ride, jog, or even skate ride at any time of the year. You can also take a beach yoga class to unwind after all of the eating and exercises.

6. What's the Vibe Like?

There is a vibrant downtown culture in Fort Lauderdale as well. Many artists have moved to Fort Lauderdale in recent years. A large crowd of artists is drawn to events and communities such as the Flagler Arts and Technology Village. Art galleries are offered at FATVillage, which is located in downtown Fort Lauderdale.

A low unemployment rate and rising income margin mean that working in Fort Lauderdale is something to be enjoyed. Healthcare and marine professions are among the chief moneymaking positions in Fort Lauderdale.

7. Is Fort Lauderdale Family Friendly? 

Relocating to Fort Lauderdale is a good choice if you want to start a family. Fort Lauderdale features one of the most accredited school districts in the country. There are also a handful of higher education establishments. There are also many higher education art institutes that make Fort Lauderdale just that much better for artists.

8. Balance Your Finances 

Relocating to Fort Lauderdale is a fantastic choice for anyone who is financially conscientious. The average home price in the city has been on a steady decrease since 2005. All you have to do is choose a Fort Lauderdale neighborhood and before you know it you’ll be living in the sunny southern Florida region!

9. Before You Make the Big Move

To make you're relocating to Fort Lauderdale a little easier, take a few things into consideration. Rid your wardrobe of any bulky winter coats or snow boots, as you will not need them when living in the city. Average temperatures stay above 60 degrees all year long. If you are taking your vehicle to Fort Lauderdale with you, make sure it has appropriate tires and windscreen wipers because when it rains, it pours. Just to be safe given a number of hurricanes that are always a possibility in the region, invest in a good disaster-readiness kit for the event that there is an emergency. When you arrive in the city on the day of the move, try to schedule your things to arrive at the new home in midday. Traffic lights at this time, so you won't experience and congestion that will put a damper on your moving plans.

10. Make Moving to Fort Lauderdale Fun!

All weather and logistical warnings aside, you should be excited about moving to Fort Lauderdale! There are so many things to enjoy about the beautiful city. The lifestyle and culture that one can take up when they relocate to Fort Lauderdale is something of a marvel. The job market, as well as the home market, are also factors that keep people relocating to Fort Lauderdale.

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