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Moving to Charlotte%2C NC

A Complete Moving Guide: Living in Charlotte, NC

moving to Charlotte

  1. Where is Charlotte & What Does It Have to Offer?
  2. Charlotte NC Weather: Experience All 4 Seasons
  3. Charlotte Urban Forests
  4. Low-Cost Living
  5. Charlotte Educational Services
  6. Enjoy Mother Nature: Outdoor Activities Galore
  7. Southern Hospitality
  8. Affordable Housing Charlotte, NC
  9. Cultural Focal Points Charlotte Has to Offer

1. Where is Charlotte & What Does It Have to Offer?

Moving to Charlotte grants many prospects to new residents. With a growing job market, diversified climate, and extremely low cost of living, as well as varied neighborhoods and good education systems keep people moving to Charlotte in great numbers. There are neighborhoods for every type of person, the most popular being the No-Da neighborhood, which supports live music venues and other artistic performances. Charlotte is also a short drive away from many state beaches, as well as many other outdoor activities. Moving to Charlotte is also an attractive choice for senior citizens or retirees.

The city boasts a world-class healthcare system, as well as many museums and churches for elderly people and all residents to enjoy alike. The workforce in Charlotte is known for being one of the best in the country, with a high concentration of well-rounded individuals. With a great transportation system and a high amount of social activity, Charlotte has proven to be quite the place to live.

Keep reading for more information on what makes Charlotte, North Carolina a great place to move!

2. Charlotte NC Weather: Experience All 4 Seasons

First of all, moving to Charlotte means that you will be able to actually feel all four seasons as they are taking place. The weather is clear year round. There are very warm summers, but surprisingly cool and mild winters. There are over 200 days of annual sun in Charlotte, meaning that residents can go outside and enjoy a sunny day with their friendly neighbors.

3. Charlotte Urban Forests

Speaking of nature, many residents and visitors marvel over the trees in Charlotte. Just a few years ago, Charlotte was named one of the ten best cities for Urban Forests. A stroll through one of Charlottes many neighborhoods will expose you to the natural beauty of the trees and other foliage that earned Charlotte this title. There is an ordinance in place to protect the trees from losing their beauty. TreesCharlotte, a collective organization in the city, has donated much of their time over the years to preserving and planting new trees in Charlotte and its surrounding neighborhoods. There is also a public fund set up to keep the tree canopy green and luscious for years to come.

4. Low-Cost Living

Moving to Charlotte will also allow you to enjoy a low cost of living. Charlotte is ranked among the highest on the list of cities with low costs of living. Housing costs in Charlotte are also very low. The average home price is eighteen percent lower than any other state in the country, to be exact. Home electric bills are kept low due to the fact that climate control is seldom needed in a climate that is as temperate as that of Charlotte.

5. Charlotte Educational Services

Charlotte also boasts one of the best education systems around. The Central Piedmont Community College offers a wide array of classes, ranging from small business basics to self-defense, financing, and even a class on the history of Charlotte. UNC, or the University of North Carolina, offers classes for larger career goals, such as law and financing, as well as teaching credential courses. If none of this sounds good to you, there are many other community colleges in the area that surely offer whatever interests you.

6. Enjoy Mother Nature: Outdoor Activities Galore

There is no shortage of outdoor activities in Charlotte. Hundreds of golf courses spread all across North Carolina mean that you are never too far away from the green. Thirty of these courses are within the county that houses Charlotte. If you are more of an aquatic person, then you can enjoy the outdoors in the water. Charlotte offers some of the best whitewater rafting in the country. More recreational water lovers will enjoy access to the lakes for fishing and casual boating. You can even go zip lining at the whitewater rafting center. Find the largest movers nationwide.

7. Southern Hospitality

Moving to Charlotte also means that you will experience some of the most genuine southern hospitality around. Sweet tea is always available to anyone who asks for it, and it will be poured with a big smile that makes anybody feel right at home. When you move to Charlotte, don't be shocked if a neighbor introduces themselves before you even finish getting out of the car for the first time.

8. Affordable Moving and Housing Charlotte, NC

There are many housing options available for residents of Charlotte as well. From small apartments to large condos and tract housing, there is something for everyone. There are homes that were built at the turn of the century on the market, as well as upscale housing in the Myers Park region that is perfect for people who work uptown. There is definitely no shortage of housing, much of which is financially available to everyone.

9. Cultural Focal Points Charlotte Has to Offer

Charlotte is also a hub for the arts. Culture has taken over some areas of the city, with more artistic neighborhoods proudly showing their heritage. There are plenty of museums to enjoy, as well as theater and symphony showcase locations. If you are into acting, then the Actor’s Theater of Charlotte is right there of you. Local actors can easily spread their talent with every member of Charlotte. If you need two men and a truck and want to know your cost please read our post about it.

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In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

In the 20th century, the 1940 film "They Drive by Night" co-starred Humphrey Bogart. He plays an independent driver struggling to become financially stable and economically independent. This is all set during the times of the Great Depression. Yet another film was released in 1941, called "The Gang's All Here". It is a story of a trucking company that's been targeted by saboteurs.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) are fundamental to the FMCSA's compliance program. The purpose of the CSA program is to oversee and focus on motor carriers' safety performance. To enforce such safety regulations, the CSA conducts roadside inspections and crash investigations. The program issues violations when instances of noncompliance with CSA safety regulations are exposed.   Unfortunately, the CSA's number of safety investigation teams and state law enforcement partners are rather small in comparison to the millions of CMV companies and commercial driver license (CDL) holders. A key factor in the CSA program is known as the Safety Measurement System (SMS). This system relies on data analysis to identify unsafe companies to arrange them for safety interventions. SMS is incredibly helpful to CSA in finding and holding companies accountable for safety performance.  

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

The most basic purpose of a trailer jack is to lift the trailer to a height that allows the trailer to hitch or unhitch to and from the towing vehicle. Trailer jacks may also be used for the leveling of the trailer during storage. To list a few common types of trailer jacks are A-frame jacks, swivel jacks, and drop-leg jacks. Other trailers, such as horse trailers, have a built-in jack at the tongue for this purpose.

In order to load or unload bots and other cargo to and from a trailer, trailer winches are designed for this purpose. They consist of a ratchet mechanism and cable. The handle on the ratchet mechanism is then turned to tighten or loosen the tension on the winch cable. Trailer winches vary, some are manual while others are motorized. Trailer winches are most typically found on the front of the trailer by towing an A-frame.

Some trailers can be towed by an accessible pickup truck or van, which generally need no special permit beyond a regular license. Such examples would be enclosed toy trailers and motorcycle trailers. Specialized trailers like an open-air motorcycle trailer and bicycle trailers are accessible. Some trailers are much more accessible to small automobiles, as are some simple trailers pulled by a drawbar and riding on a single set of axles. Other trailers also have a variety, such as a utility trailer, travel trailers or campers, etc. to allow for varying sizes of tow vehicles.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.