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United States Tennessee

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United States Tennessee

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United States Tennessee

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United States Tennessee

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United States Tennessee

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United States Tennessee

Wonderful Moving Companies In Tennessee


Let's just say you're looking for the best Tennessee moving companies. Local moving company reviews aren't the only resources you should consult. Oftentimes, the best Tennessee movers can appear while browsing interstate Tennessee moving reviews. These reviews give you an inside look to find the right state to state moving company. Moving Authority has a list of Tennessee interstate movers where you can pick a cross country mover. If you're moving within Tennessee, get a free moving quote from us today. The best Tennessee priced movers are right here. With a Tennessee movers cost estimate, you'll be able to make a budget and get moving. Check Moving Authority during your move for moving tips, discount relocation rates, and more.

Do you know the difference between local movers and self service movers? How about which Tennessee long distance movers offer the best car transport in Tennessee? When you're searching for an American moving company, you need to be as informed as possible. Moving Authority offers free moving estimates and Tennessee moving company reviews so that you can give yourself as much information as you need. You want a company that will do more for you than move your furniture. Get a moving cost estimate for a company you can trust.


4 Reasons Companies Hire Day Laborers -- And How To Spot Them

  • It costs a lot of money to hire full-time employees who are paid a fair wage, and there are plenty of unqualified day laborers who are more than happy to do a job for little pay. This is a common characteristic of rogue movers.
  • Additionally, outfitting all these employees with benefits like Workman's Compensation Insurance is expensive.
  • Thorough training and equipment is also a huge expense for moving companies, so shady companies will often go without these things and hope for the best.
  • If a Tennesse moving and storage company lacks the proper federal licensing, reputable movers will not want to work there and be associated with that company name.

Tipping vs. Not Tipping: The Great Debate

  • Do I have to? It isn't a requirement to tip your movers, but you absolutely should if you received amazing service.
  • But why? Well, the moving industry is a very tough business, and quality movers do very difficult manual labor to make sure your move is handled the right way.
  • Why can't they include the tip as part of the contract? A tip to movers is based directly on the level of service you receive, and the amount is based on your discretion, so it's impossible (not to mention illegal) to include such an item in the contract.
  • How much should I tip my movers? The industry standard is around 5% to 10% of the total moving cost.



The Ultimate DOs and DON’Ts of Moving to Tennessee

  • DO your research on the area where you’ll be moving. Whether it’s one town over or you’re coming from another state, make sure you can locate key points like the police station, the hospital, the post office, or even where you’ll be buying your groceries.
  • DON’T wait until the last minute to transfer your utilities—you run the risk of not having electricity or water for a day or two!
  • DO smile at the new neighbors and wave back at them when they welcome you. Southern Hospitality is a real thing, and it’s a way of life down in Tennessee.
  • DON’T be alarmed by older ladies you just met calling you “sweetheart,” “honey,” baby,” or any other term of endearment. Again, this is Southern Hospitality at its finest, and whether you’re a man or a woman, someone’s going to call you “sweetheart.”
  • DO enjoy the barbecue, the country music, the slow pace of life, and the Great Smoky Mountains.
  • DON’T forget to visit famous attractions like Graceland, Dollywood, and the Grand Ole Opry.


Raise Your Family in a Safe, Clean, FUN City — Without Breaking the Bank

  • Knoxville, TN has something for everyone, from the shopping in market square to the history to be learned at the Ramsey House.
  • Memphis, TN is home to a myriad of museums and historic sites, including the most famous that Tennessee has to offer: Elvis Presley’s Graceland.
  • Nashville, TN is a fun time for everyone who pays a visit; from the wide variety of public parks to the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Grand Ole Opry, there’s an activity for everyone in the family.
  • Gatlinburg, TN is almost like the Las Vegas of the East, but safe for kids. The entire town is built around a strip of fun houses, amusement parks, and lift rides over the majesty of the Great Smoky Mountains.

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In order to load or unload bots and other cargo to and from a trailer, trailer winches are designed for this purpose. They consist of a ratchet mechanism and cable. The handle on the ratchet mechanism is then turned to tighten or loosen the tension on the winch cable. Trailer winches vary, some are manual while others are motorized. Trailer winches are most typically found on the front of the trailer by towing an A-frame.

Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

Smoke and the Bandit was released in 1977, becoming the third-highest grossing movie. Following only behind Star Wars Episode IV and Close Encounter of the Third Kind, all three movies making an impact on popular culture. Conveniently, during that same year, CB Bears debuted as well. The Saturday morning cartoon features mystery-solving bears who communicate by CB radio. As the 1970's decade began to end and the 80's broke through, the trucking phenomenon had wade. With the rise of cellular phone technology, the CB radio was no longer popular with passenger vehicles, but, truck drivers still use it today.

1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

Driver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Union in order to for the complex rules to all member states. Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat. Licences first acquired after 1997, the weight was reduced to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.

Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.

In the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items to be moved and the distance it will go. Cost is also based on how quickly the items are to be moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.