Tennessee Movers Top Rated

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201 Movers in Tennessee

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kristi S.

Try not to utilize this moving Company. The main thing that turned out badly was the proprietor did not have me planned for the right day. Upon the arrival of my turn, I needed to call and ask him where his group was. They were assume to arrive at 9:00 am however did not appear until 11:20 am. The proprietor did not give me a rebate for his misstep. After the move, I found some gems and coins missing. When I reported it to the proprietor, he was not exceptionally supportive. I will never utilize this organization again. In the event that you choose to utilize this organization, be cautious.

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mark O

Incredible folks, went ahead time, great contact, took great consideration of fragile things, and made conveyance date! Much appreciated again folks!

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - M. Kalanyak

Great Services!

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jeffery C

Horrible cross-country move experience. After signing the contract, the sales person wouldn't return my calls. Movers arrived 5 days later than promised. Bought insurance and submitted a claim for broken items, but Coleman wouldn't honor this because we packed the items ourselves (and they wouldn't refund our insurance payment). Avoid.

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Erin B

Being in the military I have moved alot and have never had a worst moving experience that I had with this company. They did not deliver my household goods to the specified address on the delivery date we had set up 3 months in advance! But they took them to a completely different address on the wrong date and then were told there was nothing they could do about it. Not to mention they sent us the two SLOWEST movers ever. One stood outside and smoked the whole time and the other played on his cell phone the whole time. Took them 3 hours to pack up a dresser full of sweaters. When I called the office to get answers about why they didn't deliver to the address on the date we had set up 3 months in advance i was told they weren't talking to me and hung up on by the owner on several occasions. They basically took my money and did what they wanted with my stuff and couldn't discuss it with me. The worst customer service I have ever experienced! DO NOT USE THIS COMPANY. They will lie to you and then cannot answer to what they did wrong. Just hang up on you and then not take anymore of your calls. VERY UNTRUSTWORTHY!

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - James Smith

Great people to work with they work fast and charged me by the hour. I was very happy with my move and would definitely recommend them on here and to my Family and Friends.

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - nelly k.

I'm not certain who to contact, but rather I would have liked to let you realize that your movers made a brilliant showing for us a week ago. They were exceptionally proficient and to a great degree cautious with our merchandise, as well as with our new home. I was extremely inspired by them. I'm absolutely happy we utilized your group to finish our turn. Much obliged to you for the great administration, Matthew

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Victor

Awesome!

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Catherine L

We work at a senior group and dependably call of Nathan and his gathering! Legitimate, pleasant and dependably puts our inhabitants first. I would very prescribe them to anybody, for any sort of move.

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Camille P

This is our third move with Liberty in under 3 years. They are constantly proficient all the way. Their movers are polite and exhaustive. We have an expansive armoire which couldn't fit through the room entryway. They dismantled and reassembled it with no issue I very prescribe Liberty to any individual who might be moving. Camille P

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sean Everett

My wife and I had an awesome experience with Triple 7 Movers. They saved our day when another moving service cancelled on us an hour and thirty minutes before the "confirmed" moving time. Triple 7 Movers appeared same day and kept the moving as planned. The group is responsible, strong and dependable. I would recommend Triple 7 Movers to everybody.

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Rachel T

Lynn Taff was an absolute nightmare to work with. My husband and I relocated to Knoxville with his employer 6 months ago and his employer selected the low-ball quote Atlas had provided. If you are reading this because you are moving, please be warned...this company is very unprofessional. There are so many more companies who will do a better job. Also, be sure you understand the insurance.

United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - richard walters

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United States Tennessee

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Allison S

Cost $2,000 more than expected! The movers were great! Loved Oscar and Alex with Allied movers! We were appraised for a little over 6000 lbs and we ended up with a total wight over 8,000 lbs. I don't know how that worked, we sold off a lot of our big furnature before the move. Our total out of pocket was $2000 more than we were expecting to pay. I don't know how their appraisal was a ton off?! They demanded that we pay before dropping off our shipment. We hand to scramble to make funds available to pay for our new total.

United States Tennessee

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United States Tennessee

Wonderful Moving Companies In Tennessee


Let's just say you're looking for the best Tennessee moving companies. Local moving company reviews aren't the only resources you should consult. Oftentimes, the best Tennessee movers can appear while browsing interstate Tennessee moving reviews. These reviews give you an inside look to find the right state to state moving company. Moving Authority has a list of Tennessee interstate movers where you can pick a cross country mover. If you're moving within Tennessee, get a free moving quote from us today. The best Tennessee priced movers are right here. With a Tennessee movers cost estimate, you'll be able to make a budget and get moving. Check Moving Authority during your move for moving tips, discount relocation rates, and more.

Do you know the difference between local movers and self service movers? How about which Tennessee long distance movers offer the best car transport in Tennessee? When you're searching for an American moving company, you need to be as informed as possible. Moving Authority offers free moving estimates and Tennessee moving company reviews so that you can give yourself as much information as you need. You want a company that will do more for you than move your furniture. Get a moving cost estimate for a company you can trust.


4 Reasons Companies Hire Day Laborers -- And How To Spot Them

  • It costs a lot of money to hire full-time employees who are paid a fair wage, and there are plenty of unqualified day laborers who are more than happy to do a job for little pay. This is a common characteristic of rogue movers.
  • Additionally, outfitting all these employees with benefits like Workman's Compensation Insurance is expensive.
  • Thorough training and equipment is also a huge expense for moving companies, so shady companies will often go without these things and hope for the best.
  • If a Tennesse moving and storage company lacks the proper federal licensing, reputable movers will not want to work there and be associated with that company name.

Tipping vs. Not Tipping: The Great Debate

  • Do I have to? It isn't a requirement to tip your movers, but you absolutely should if you received amazing service.
  • But why? Well, the moving industry is a very tough business, and quality movers do very difficult manual labor to make sure your move is handled the right way.
  • Why can't they include the tip as part of the contract? A tip to movers is based directly on the level of service you receive, and the amount is based on your discretion, so it's impossible (not to mention illegal) to include such an item in the contract.
  • How much should I tip my movers? The industry standard is around 5% to 10% of the total moving cost.



The Ultimate DOs and DON’Ts of Moving to Tennessee

  • DO your research on the area where you’ll be moving. Whether it’s one town over or you’re coming from another state, make sure you can locate key points like the police station, the hospital, the post office, or even where you’ll be buying your groceries.
  • DON’T wait until the last minute to transfer your utilities—you run the risk of not having electricity or water for a day or two!
  • DO smile at the new neighbors and wave back at them when they welcome you. Southern Hospitality is a real thing, and it’s a way of life down in Tennessee.
  • DON’T be alarmed by older ladies you just met calling you “sweetheart,” “honey,” baby,” or any other term of endearment. Again, this is Southern Hospitality at its finest, and whether you’re a man or a woman, someone’s going to call you “sweetheart.”
  • DO enjoy the barbecue, the country music, the slow pace of life, and the Great Smoky Mountains.
  • DON’T forget to visit famous attractions like Graceland, Dollywood, and the Grand Ole Opry.


Raise Your Family in a Safe, Clean, FUN City — Without Breaking the Bank

  • Knoxville, TN has something for everyone, from the shopping in market square to the history to be learned at the Ramsey House.
  • Memphis, TN is home to a myriad of museums and historic sites, including the most famous that Tennessee has to offer: Elvis Presley’s Graceland.
  • Nashville, TN is a fun time for everyone who pays a visit; from the wide variety of public parks to the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Grand Ole Opry, there’s an activity for everyone in the family.
  • Gatlinburg, TN is almost like the Las Vegas of the East, but safe for kids. The entire town is built around a strip of fun houses, amusement parks, and lift rides over the majesty of the Great Smoky Mountains.

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The American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association tried numerous moves. One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

Prior to the 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads. During this time, trains were essential, and they were highly efficient at moving large amounts of freight. But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport. Though there were several trucks throughout this time, they were used more as space for advertising that for actual utility. At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging. The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

In 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

Business routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) are fundamental to the FMCSA's compliance program. The purpose of the CSA program is to oversee and focus on motor carriers' safety performance. To enforce such safety regulations, the CSA conducts roadside inspections and crash investigations. The program issues violations when instances of noncompliance with CSA safety regulations are exposed.   Unfortunately, the CSA's number of safety investigation teams and state law enforcement partners are rather small in comparison to the millions of CMV companies and commercial driver license (CDL) holders. A key factor in the CSA program is known as the Safety Measurement System (SMS). This system relies on data analysis to identify unsafe companies to arrange them for safety interventions. SMS is incredibly helpful to CSA in finding and holding companies accountable for safety performance.  

The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

Relocation, or moving, is the process of vacating a fixed location, such as a residence or business, and settling in a different one. A move might be to a nearby location such as in the same neighborhood or a much farther location in a different city or even a different country. Moving usually includes packing up all belongings, transferring them to the new location, and unpacking them. It will also be necessary to update administrative information. This includes tasks such as notifying the post office, changing registration data, change of insurance, services etc. It is important to remember this step in the relocation process. 

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

In today's society, there are rules and regulations everywhere you go, the same goes for commercial vehicles. The federal government has strict regulations that must be met, such as how many hours a driver may be on the clock. For example, 11 hours driving /14 hours on-duty followed by 10 hours off, with a max of 70 hours/8 days or 60 hours/7 days. They can also set rules deciding how much rest and sleep time is required, however, these are only a couple of regulations set. Any violations are often subject to harsh penalties. In some cases, there are instruments to track each driver's hours, which are becoming more necessary.