South Carolina Movers Top Rated

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206 Movers in South Carolina

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LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sara Bordieri

“Astro movers is amazing!!! Punctual and hard wo...”

“Astro movers is amazing!!! Punctual and hard working!!! They helped move me up 3 flights of stairs with no complaints...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jon W

“Great bunch of guys. Very professional, in unif...”

“Great bunch of guys. Very professional, in uniform and never stopped till they had me unloaded.”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Penelopy Banello

“We were concerned about the construction debris...”

“We were concerned about the construction debris in our yard because Hurricane Matthew was 24 hours away. I also did ...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kathleen A.

“They were to a great degree quick, productive, ...”

“They were to a great degree quick, productive, and cautious taking care of delicate things. Exceptionally prescribed.”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Victor D.

“When I requested that ask, this prick began sho...”

“When I requested that ask, this prick began shouting at me on the telephone and letting me know that he was not going...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kathy N

“We as of late did a nearby move with Azalea. I ...”

“We as of late did a nearby move with Azalea. I recognize our business rep Christy for a precise offer. We got another...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Almira

“Move4Less is the opposite of the company name. ...”

“Move4Less is the opposite of the company name. They charged me $2820 for 12 hours but their team only worked for 8 ho...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Pryanka

“The experience was great. They dealt with my st...”

“The experience was great. They dealt with my stuff, they were anything but difficult to work with and when we kept in...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jerry blazer

“Not professional tried to hit on my wife”

“Not professional tried to hit on my wife”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Eddie J.

“Went into Peninsula Guns today and was fulfille...”

“Went into Peninsula Guns today and was fulfilled by my visit. A men of their word named Paul helped us and never left...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Nichola M

“Very professional, prompt in response and willi...”

“Very professional, prompt in response and willing to meet our price. Well recommended by their referrals as well. ;-)”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mona Dayhoff

“Richard, John and Antonio helped me move to Mou...”

“Richard, John and Antonio helped me move to Mount Pleasant. They were dependable, proficient and persevering. They to...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Adrian K.

“I really had a better than average involvement ...”

“I really had a better than average involvement with this moving company. They moved my stuff from my old flat to my n...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Thomas B

“Most exceedingly awful. Organization. EVER. ...”

“Most exceedingly awful. Organization. EVER. Keep away from THIS COMPANY At all costs. My experience was so awful ...”

United States South Carolina

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - April D.

“So their costs were really normal. We've utiliz...”

“So their costs were really normal. We've utilized this organization before and we knew that they work well so why no...”

United States South Carolina

How To Have An Effortless Move to South Carolina


Moving Authority has a list of the best South Carolina interstate movers so that you can find a state to state moving company. The best South Carolina moving companies are right here and can be found by reading interstate South Carolina moving reviews. We help you select a cross-country mover from our list of the best South Carolina movers. Moving Authority offers a variety of moving tips and local moving reviews for customers. Our goal is to help link you with the best South Carolina priced movers. Get a free moving quote with a South Carolina movers cost estimate and see how we can help you. Shop discount relocation rates today at Moving Authority.

These days, many people opt for self-service movers over South Carolina long distance movers. If you only want to move your furniture, this may be a wise decision. But if you're looking for the best car transport in South Carolina, research South Carolina moving company reviews. Moving Authority offers these with free moving estimates so you can find the right American moving company for you. Get a moving cost estimate to compare local movers and have an easy move. Your moving companies in SC are waiting!


Moving With Children: How to Keep Your Head Through the Hassle

  • It can be difficult to make kids get rid of toys, even if they never play with them anymore. If there are certain items you know your kids will never touch again, stash them away a few weeks before packing and if your kids don’t wonder where they are, it’s a safe bet that you can donate them to charity.
  • Be sure to outline every task that needs to be done. This way, you can easily identify all chores and moving doesn’t seem quite as stressful.
  • Give your kids some duties that can help with the moving effort so that they can feel included and you can get some extra stuff done.
  • Be flexible. As with almost everything in life when you have children, moving to SC is an experience that can have many surprises pop up.



How To Eat Your Way Through South Carolina Like A True Southerner

  • Shrimp & grits are a local delicacy that you’re hard-pressed to find anywhere outside the American Southeast. Though many Southern states make the dish, it’s best in South Carolina.
  • Oysters are eaten by the dozen and natives never get tired of them.
  • You can eat red crab any old day; South Carolinians know that the best crabmeat under the sun is pulled from blue crabs.
  • The barbecue in South Carolina is more than just grilled meat; it’s a way of life. South Carolinians take their barbecue seriously, and never even dream of having it without first bathing it in a homemade hot sauce.



5 Quick Reasons That Charleston Will Be Your New Favorite City

  • Southern Hospitality is alive and well, and you’ll never feel like a stranger to anyone.
  • Days are spent lounging on the porch in wicker rocking chairs, enjoying the sunshine, year-round.
  • The way the sunsets dance along the waterfront will steal your heart.
  • Tea is served sweet and the best crabmeat is blue.

4 Red Flags of a Super Low Price You Shouldn't Overlook

  • You should never pay less than $70 per hour for professional movers. One reason for a deep discount below the industry standard is that companies might skimp on Worker's Compensation Insurance, which means that if a mover is injured on your property, YOU have to foot the bill.
  • If the SC movers lack valid federal licensing, they might try to entice customers with outrageously low rates.
  • When you're paying a ridiculously discounted price, you're probably not getting well-trained and qualified movers, but day laborers who will work for low wages.
  • Moving scams are unfortunately prevalent. If the price seems too low and you are trying to find "the catch," trust your instinct. Rogue movers are always trying to find new ways to rip-off customers.

Do you know?

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Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

Alongside the many different trailers provided are motorcycle trailers. They are designed to haul motorcycles behind an automobile or truck. Depending on size and capability, some trailer may be able to carry several motorcycles or perhaps just one. They specifically designed this trailer to meet the needs of motorcyclists. They carry motorcycles, have ramps, and include tie-downs. There may be a utility trailer adapted permanently or occasionally to haul one or more motorcycles.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

Advocation for better transportation began historically in the late 1870s of the United States. This is when the Good Roads Movement first occurred, lasting all the way throughout the 1920s. Bicyclist leaders advocated for improved roads. Their acts led to the turning of local agitation into the national political movement it became.

Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) are fundamental to the FMCSA's compliance program. The purpose of the CSA program is to oversee and focus on motor carriers' safety performance. To enforce such safety regulations, the CSA conducts roadside inspections and crash investigations. The program issues violations when instances of noncompliance with CSA safety regulations are exposed.   Unfortunately, the CSA's number of safety investigation teams and state law enforcement partners are rather small in comparison to the millions of CMV companies and commercial driver license (CDL) holders. A key factor in the CSA program is known as the Safety Measurement System (SMS). This system relies on data analysis to identify unsafe companies to arrange them for safety interventions. SMS is incredibly helpful to CSA in finding and holding companies accountable for safety performance.  

The FMCSA has established rules to maintain and regulate the safety of the trucking industry. According to FMCSA rules, driving a goods-carrying CMV more than 11 hours or to drive after having been on duty for 14 hours, is illegal. Due to such heavy driving, they need a break to complete other tasks such as loading and unloading cargo, stopping for gas and other required vehicle inspections, as well as non-working duties such as meal and rest breaks. The 3-hour difference between the 11-hour driving limit and 14 hour on-duty limit gives drivers time to take care of such duties. In addition, after completing an 11 to 14 hour on duty period, the driver much be allowed 10 hours off-duty.

The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

The term 'trailer' is commonly used interchangeably with that of a travel trailer or mobile home. There are varieties of trailers and manufactures housing designed for human habitation. Such origins can be found historically with utility trailers built in a similar fashion to horse-drawn wagons. A trailer park is an area where mobile homes are designated for people to live in.   In the United States, trailers ranging in size from single-axle dollies to 6-axle, 13 ft 6 in (4,115 mm) high, 53 ft (16,154 mm) in long semi-trailers is common. Although, when towed as part of a tractor-trailer or "18-wheeler", carries a large percentage of the freight. Specifically, the freight that travels over land in North America.