Pennsylvania Movers Top Rated

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423 Movers in Pennsylvania

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Diane M.

“Steve and his group are extraordinary. Moving i...”

“Steve and his group are extraordinary. Moving is an upsetting occasion, yet they improved the experience and offered ...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Alfredo Z.

“Great administration! Quick, clean, to a great ...”

“Great administration! Quick, clean, to a great degree neighborly and proficient... This organization is precisely wha...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jay B.

“I have utilized this moving company for the lka...”

“I have utilized this moving company for the lkast year shipping commerical items from Detroit adn LA to Atlanta and f...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kiki U.

“I as of lately needed to plan a last moment mov...”

“I as of lately needed to plan a last moment move.They planned me quickly, turned out to my home and were inconceivabl...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Marsha Mckinney

“I reached the proprietor of this moving company...”

“I reached the proprietor of this moving company as a consequence of a referral from a companion. my telephonic corres...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Alex M.

“Exceptionally despondent with the client benefi...”

“Exceptionally despondent with the client benefit, and moving. I felt that I was pandered and misled with the goal...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Glenda S.

“A rep should go to my home to give me an evalua...”

“A rep should go to my home to give me an evaluation. He/she never showed up or called to scratch off. After my second...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jason O.

“Unmistakably extremely experienced; and the gre...”

“Unmistakably extremely experienced; and the greater part of our possessions were taken care of with extraordinary car...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Laurie W.

“Aron moved my things to another apartment and d...”

“Aron moved my things to another apartment and did phenomenal job. Came on time, moved everything in on time, proficie...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Val T.

“The three man crew that moved us yesterday, arr...”

“The three man crew that moved us yesterday, arrived on time and ready to work. They were professional and respected o...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - William L.

“I've utilized them several times now, and I'll ...”

“I've utilized them several times now, and I'll be utilizing them again if necessary, they've generally been affable t...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Justin Furch

“Amateur moving company. Workers were careless w...”

“Amateur moving company. Workers were careless with the things, and obnoxious and rude. We had damaged furniture and t...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Linda P.

“We as of late moved from Beaver to Annandale ,V...”

“We as of late moved from Beaver to Annandale ,Va. Park Moving was the moving company we used to move us. The move was...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ricardo A.

“I am so happy I ran with these folks. I could p...”

“I am so happy I ran with these folks. I could plan the move same day and they were speedy, effective and affable. My ...”

United States Pennsylvania

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Markus A.

“I give them an A+! Than you for giving us a pos...”

“I give them an A+! Than you for giving us a positive moving experience. Will use them again next time.”

United States Pennsylvania

Picking The Right Pennsylvania Movers


Interstate Pennsylvania moving reviews are imperative to finding the best Pennsylvania moving companies. If you need to find a state to state moving company from a list of Pennsylvania interstate movers, we can help. Moving Authority gives consumers access to the best Pennsylvania priced movers. We offer local moving company reviews, moving tips, and more. Find a cross country movers PA today and get a free moving quote. With our help, you can get a Pennsylvania movers cost estimate. Use this to seek out the best Pennsylvania movers and discount relocation rates. With Moving Authority at your disposal, moving within Pennsylvania is a piece of cake.

Finding the best car transport in Pennsylvania can be tricky, but we're here to help. Pennsylvania moving company reviews and free moving estimates are available to you. We get it: you want more than local movers or self-service movers to just move your furniture.  You want an American moving company that you can rely on. Get a moving cost estimate for Pennsylvania long distance movers from Moving Authority and see how spectacular your move can be.

The Art of Relocation: HOW TO GET THE MOST FOR YOUR MONEY

  • Read reviews. Check out what other clients have said in the past about the moving company Pennsylvania you want to hire.
  • Call them. Did the person answer the phone pleasantly? Ask about their services on offer. Is the rep competent and happy to assist?
  • Visit the office. Is everything clean, organized, and professional? Ask detailed questions about charges, how to prepare for moving day, and what you should be doing on your end.
  • Schedule an in-person quote. Not only is this the most effective form of getting an estimate, but you’ll get a chance to watch the estimator on the job.
  • Ensure that all fees are explained in detail and that your estimate is a binding quote, which means you're protected from surprise fees.


Don’t Make One of These Beginner's Mistakes When Moving

  • Not Verifying the Company. The FMCSA and the USDOT must fully license and insure the company you want to hire. If not, this company is operating illegally and shouldn't be considered for your business.
  • Not Checking the Tariff. If a company's tariff isn't valid, or if they just don't have one, they will fail USDOT inspections. This makes them an illegitimate company and puts your household goods at risk.
  • Getting the Cheapest Plan. Moving costs a lot, but it's better to invest in a good company than finding your stuff in a million pieces at your destination.

4 Can’t-Miss Things When You Move To Pennsylvania

  • Carnegie Institutes of Pittsburgh: four museums that encompass a range of interests including the Andy Warhol Museum, Carnegie Museum of Art, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, and Carnegie Science Center.
  • Mount Washington: hike, walk, bike, and take in the sweeping views of one of the top cities in Pennsylvania
  • Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens: Breathe easily, and take a stroll through the lush greenery.
  • Mattress Factory: though it seems like a place to take a nap, this is actually an eclectic museum full of full-room exhibitions and creative installations.

 

Paying the Price: Why You Need a Binding Price Moving Quote

  • Moving quotes can be fickle: the less comprehensive a quote is, the more it can vary when it actually comes time to move.
  • When you obtain a phone online or over the phone, you’re really only getting a ballpark estimate.
  • Moving costs are calculated by the total weight of the items moved, as well as the labor costs and drive time it takes to complete the move.
  • What you can do to protect yourself from rising costs is to get what’s called a binding price quote. This is exactly what it sounds like: a quote which binds the customer and the moving company to a certain price.
  • The only time a price will differ from the binding price quote is if the customer actually has a less total weight of items to be moved, in which case, the price will be lower.
  • What about if additional services are requested or even required after the binding quote is issued? In these cases, moving companies Pennsylvania will generally add an addendum to the binding quote with an estimate for additional services.

 

 

Do you know?

Do you know quotes

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

In 1976, the number one hit on the Billboard chart was "Convoy," a novelty song by C.W. McCall about a convoy of truck drivers evading speed traps and toll booths across America. The song inspired the 1978 action film Convoy directed by Sam Peckinpah. After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike and participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis (although similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis).

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

As we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo. Trailers may also be used in a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation. The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States. The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) are fundamental to the FMCSA's compliance program. The purpose of the CSA program is to oversee and focus on motor carriers' safety performance. To enforce such safety regulations, the CSA conducts roadside inspections and crash investigations. The program issues violations when instances of noncompliance with CSA safety regulations are exposed.   Unfortunately, the CSA's number of safety investigation teams and state law enforcement partners are rather small in comparison to the millions of CMV companies and commercial driver license (CDL) holders. A key factor in the CSA program is known as the Safety Measurement System (SMS). This system relies on data analysis to identify unsafe companies to arrange them for safety interventions. SMS is incredibly helpful to CSA in finding and holding companies accountable for safety performance.  

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Words have always had a different meaning or have been used interchangeably with others across all cultures. In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles. Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency that is devoted to transportation in the United States. The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel and issue's USDOT Number filing to new carriers. The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.