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1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Dennis W.

“They worked truly hard and were quick and produ...”

“They worked truly hard and were quick and productive getting the truck stacked/emptied. We had named everything and e...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Zenet R.

“They regarded my stuff, which I had a lot of ho...”

“They regarded my stuff, which I had a lot of however that is another story. I felt truly dealt with. When I move agai...”

United States Oregon

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1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jim C.

“I have moved 9 times in the most recent 20 year...”

“I have moved 9 times in the most recent 20 years so it is protected to say that I know highest quality level moving a...”

United States Oregon

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1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kristi S.

“Try not to utilize this moving Company. The mai...”

“Try not to utilize this moving Company. The main thing that turned out badly was the proprietor did not have me plann...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Bobby W.

“I was moving out of my home, putting a large po...”

“I was moving out of my home, putting a large portion of my things into capacity. These people appeared early, brought...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Cee B.

“The folks that turned out and helped us move we...”

“The folks that turned out and helped us move were awesome! We needed to move briefly out of our loft for some remedia...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Christopher Riper

“Quick and simple move - Walter and Steve were e...”

“Quick and simple move - Walter and Steve were extraordinary, they worked hard and moved us rapidly, with no damage to...”

United States Oregon

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1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jamaal R.

“They were on time and very hardworking. I woul...”

“They were on time and very hardworking. I would recommend them for moving.”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Pablo A.

“They buckled down - never did anybody slack off...”

“They buckled down - never did anybody slack off. They likewise were extremely decent and conscious and really appeare...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Cody W.

“Eminence moved my mom and I and it was a great ...”

“Eminence moved my mom and I and it was a great ordeal. Only awesome client administration and proficiency. The estima...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Rachel M.

“The pressed up everything and ensured it was se...”

“The pressed up everything and ensured it was secure. At the flip side of the move, they ensured everything wound up w...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Derrick L.

“They called before arriving, appearing at our p...”

“They called before arriving, appearing at our planned time and went right to work getting me out of my old spot and t...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Dianna W.

“Fantastic - Came on time, wrapped the majority ...”

“Fantastic - Came on time, wrapped the majority of our stuff. Indeed, even let us use boxes to pack our garments in. E...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mia R.

“These folks are great, I had a short notice emp...”

“These folks are great, I had a short notice employment and they did everything to crush in an advantageous time for m...”

United States Oregon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Nikosi M.

“The team was exceptionally quick, to a great de...”

“The team was exceptionally quick, to a great degree watchful and proficient. I was dazed by how rapidly and proficien...”

United States Oregon

Your Reliable Oregon Moving Company


When you hire a cross country mover for your relocation
, you want to know that you're getting the best Oregon moving companies. This is why reading interstate Oregon moving reviews is so crucial. By seeing what prior clients say, you can locate the best state to state moving company for the job. Moving Authority has an extensive list of Oregon interstate movers for you to make a selection, even when you're moving within Oregon. Make a point to read local moving company reviews as well to decipher the best Oregon movers. Moving Authority links you to the best Oregon priced movers with a free moving quote. You can find discount relocation rates when you have an Oregon movers cost estimate and get the most for your money. For moving tips, guides, and checklists, keep reading Moving Authority.

A moving cost estimate for self service movers to move your furniture is a cinch to obtain. You can always find an American moving company to give you free moving cost estimates, but the key to success is finding the right local movers for you. Make sure that before you get a moving cost estimate, you have read Oregon moving company reviews. You want to find top quality service for things like the best car transport in Oregon. This way, you'll know that you're choosing top-notch Oregon long distance movers. Moving to Oregon shouldn't stress you out, and with the assistance of Moving Authority, you'll find the most fantastic moving companies Oregon can offer.


The Cheat Sheet to Corporate Moving: What You Need to Know



5 Unique Restaurants You Can’t Miss in Portland

  • Broder: A Scandinavian-inspired spot with Swedish hash, Danish pancakes, and world-class cocktails.
  • Grilled Cheese Grill: What’s better than melted cheese? Melted cheese on bread. Get your fill of this iconic American dietary staple here.
  • Korean Fried Chicken: Who ever heard of such a thing? Ask any Portlander, thy’ll tell you that this place is finger-licking good.
  • Blue Star Donuts: These guys make a doughnut with cointreau syrup. Need we say more?
  • Smallwares: You’re hard-pressed to find a person who doesn’t love General Tso chicken. Here, you can get it on a sandwich.

Putting the EASE in Overseas: How to Have the Best International Move




4 Natural Wonders of Oregon That Will Change You

  • Crater Lake: swim, kayak, camp, fish, and look out at the views
  • Mt. Hood: ski, snowboard, or even slide down the mountain in an inflatable neon snow tube!
  • Painted Hills: view millennia of science and history with just one glance at this natural wonder of how our world has taken shape over millions of years.
  • The Wallowas: canyons, mountains, trail, and glimmering lakes; this treasure trove of landscapes will take your breath away.

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The most basic purpose of a trailer jack is to lift the trailer to a height that allows the trailer to hitch or unhitch to and from the towing vehicle. Trailer jacks may also be used for the leveling of the trailer during storage. To list a few common types of trailer jacks are A-frame jacks, swivel jacks, and drop-leg jacks. Other trailers, such as horse trailers, have a built-in jack at the tongue for this purpose.

The intention of a trailer coupler is to secure the trailer to the towing vehicle. It is an important piece, as the trailer couple attaches to the trailer ball. This then forms a ball and socket connection. It allows for relative movement between the towing vehicle and trailer while towing over uneven road surfaces. The trailer ball should be mounted to the rear bumper or to a drawbar, which may be removable. The drawbar secures to the trailer hitch by inserting it into the hitch receiver and pinning it.   The three most common types of couplers used are straight couplers, A-frame couplers, and adjustable couplers. Another option is bumper-pull hitches in which case draw bars can exert a large amount of leverage on the tow vehicle. This makes it harder to recover from a swerving situation (thus it may not be the safest choice depending on your trip).

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

In the 20th century, the 1940 film "They Drive by Night" co-starred Humphrey Bogart. He plays an independent driver struggling to become financially stable and economically independent. This is all set during the times of the Great Depression. Yet another film was released in 1941, called "The Gang's All Here". It is a story of a trucking company that's been targeted by saboteurs.

The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

Trailer stability can be defined as the tendency of a trailer to dissipate side-to-side motion. The initial motion may be caused by aerodynamic forces, such as from a cross wind or a passing vehicle. One common criterion for stability is the center of mass location with respect to the wheels, which can usually be detected by tongue weight. If the center of mass of the trailer is behind its wheels, therefore having a negative tongue weight, the trailer will likely be unstable. Another parameter which is less commonly a factor is the trailer moment of inertia. Even if the center of mass is forward of the wheels, a trailer with a long load, and thus large moment of inertia, may be unstable.

Business routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

Advocation for better transportation began historically in the late 1870s of the United States. This is when the Good Roads Movement first occurred, lasting all the way throughout the 1920s. Bicyclist leaders advocated for improved roads. Their acts led to the turning of local agitation into the national political movement it became.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Relocation, or moving, is the process of vacating a fixed location, such as a residence or business, and settling in a different one. A move might be to a nearby location such as in the same neighborhood or a much farther location in a different city or even a different country. Moving usually includes packing up all belongings, transferring them to the new location, and unpacking them. It will also be necessary to update administrative information. This includes tasks such as notifying the post office, changing registration data, change of insurance, services etc. It is important to remember this step in the relocation process. 

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state