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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ellie P.

“The movers were professional, hardworking and h...”

“The movers were professional, hardworking and honest. Thanks guys, amazing job!”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Gordon R.

“Thanks for another great move! This is the seco...”

“Thanks for another great move! This is the second time I hired these guys to move my family. All was on time, on bud...”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jack A Higgins

“Five stars for this company. They are very frie...”

“Five stars for this company. They are very friendly and helpful. The Best!”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Meredith B.

“On time,quick,efficient, worked with speed and ...”

“On time,quick,efficient, worked with speed and consideration. They movedy entire house in just a couple of hours, exp...”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Max R.

“Yamato Transport helped my parent's relocation ...”

“Yamato Transport helped my parent's relocation easy and problem-free. Great job guys, thanks! ”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Frank B.

“The crew did a great job moving us. Get these g...”

“The crew did a great job moving us. Get these guys for your next move you won't regret it!”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - John L.

“They moved us to California and we referred the...”

“They moved us to California and we referred them to our cousins who were moving from New Jersey to Hawaii.”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ama Agumeh

“Suddarth Relocation System dealt with my family...”

“Suddarth Relocation System dealt with my family's migration outside the US. Sunny Park and her group were astounding....”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Veronica F.

“The movers were awesome folks, truly expert, ra...”

“The movers were awesome folks, truly expert, rapid, and powerful. I don't have anything however positive things to sa...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jim B

“I'd prescribe Rainbow to any individual who's s...”

“I'd prescribe Rainbow to any individual who's searching for an expert, on time, moving organization whose movers are ...”

United States New Jersey

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Rug Cole

“Moved here from NYC. These folks wrapped and pa...”

“Moved here from NYC. These folks wrapped and packed and moved everything with incredible care. It was out of a fifte...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Markus A.

“I give them an A+! Than you for giving us a pos...”

“I give them an A+! Than you for giving us a positive moving experience. Will use them again next time.”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - R.S

“We simply had a superb experience with Peer's -...”

“We simply had a superb experience with Peer's - our family has used them a few times and has never had an awful affai...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Allen A.

“Great team! Everybody worked hard to make our m...”

“Great team! Everybody worked hard to make our move smooth and easy. Than you MI group!”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jack K.

“They are BBB Accredited A+ and Angie's List Sup...”

“They are BBB Accredited A+ and Angie's List Super Service Award 2014. Uses 3 movers and a truck $145 per hour no mini...”

United States New Jersey

Check Out These Great New Jersey Movers

Read our interstate New Jersey moving reviews to find the best cross country mover. After searching through our list of New Jersey interstate movers, the task of finding a reputable state to state moving company won't seem so daunting. The best NJ moving companies are sometimes found in local moving company reviews, so don't forget to check those out as well. Let Moving Authority give you a free moving quote. Once you have a New Jersey movers cost estimate, you'll be able to create a budget and get started on your move.

NJ moving company reviews are available to help you find an American moving company. When you want to move your furniture or have the best car transport in New Jersey, look no further. Free moving estimates are always attainable with our quote generator. For information about New Jersey long distance movers, local movers, and self service movers, you're in the right place. Scope out a moving cost estimate today, and see how easy your move can be with Moving Authority.

The moving companies NJ advertises as the best are usually your best bet for moving companies in NJ. However, to have the top NJ moving experience, it's recommended to check New Jersey movers reviews. Moving companies New Jersey locals say are worth the money can be found here in peer reviews. Choose your moving company NJ today and get moving!

Confused About the Etiquette of Tipping Movers?

  • The question of whether or not to tip movers is hotly debated in this day and age.
  • Some argue that movers make a wage from their moving companies and should not need a tip, however the fact of the matter is that wages for movers can be low. Giving them a tip is not paying them extra out of your pocket, but showing them gratitude for a job well done.
  • Many people are unsure of how much is appropriate to tip, and there’s really no flat standard as far as gratuities are concerned.
  • Factors for the tip include: the level of service you received, how intensive your moving job was, the amount of movers required, the amount of time it took.
  • Ultimately, the decision whether or not to tip falls on your shoulders, and the most basic formula for tipping is to give 5%-10% of the total cost of the move.



4 Things To Consider When Estimating the Cost of Your Home Move



The 5 Most Common Reasons For That Increased Moving Price

  • Sometimes, customers receive moving quotes that don’t quite encompass everything you require from a moving company.
  • This is no one’s fault, simply a misunderstanding between the customer and the representative from the moving company in NJ that issued the quote.
  • If you miscalculate how much stuff you’ll be moving, the price can go up with the added weight.
  • A lot of customers don’t realize that when a New Jersey mover has to use stairs or elevators, this can take extra time and, in turn, cost more money in hourly labor charges.
  • Reputable moving companies in New Jersey insured their customers’ items at sixty cents per pound, but you can also choose full value insurance on your items for an additional fee, which is something that can raise your price.
  • If you suddenly request your movers to unpack your boxes, you’ll be paying for extra labor.
  • In the event that you’re not there to meet your movers New Jersey at any point in the journey, you will be charged a waiting fee for the time that they were waiting for you, unable to work.



Little-Known Facts for First-Time Military Moves

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The American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association tried numerous moves. One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

Prior to the 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads. During this time, trains were essential, and they were highly efficient at moving large amounts of freight. But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport. Though there were several trucks throughout this time, they were used more as space for advertising that for actual utility. At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging. The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

A commercial driver's license (CDL) is a driver's license required to operate large or heavy vehicles.

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

In the 20th century, the 1940 film "They Drive by Night" co-starred Humphrey Bogart. He plays an independent driver struggling to become financially stable and economically independent. This is all set during the times of the Great Depression. Yet another film was released in 1941, called "The Gang's All Here". It is a story of a trucking company that's been targeted by saboteurs.

Medium trucks are larger than light but smaller than heavy trucks. In the US, they are defined as weighing between 13,000 and 33,000 pounds (6,000 and 15,000 kg). For the UK and the EU, the weight is between 3.5 and 7.5 tons (3.9 and 8.3 tons). Local delivery and public service (dump trucks, garbage trucks, and fire-fighting trucks) are around this size.

In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

A circumferential route refers to a public transportation system that follows the route in the shape of a circle. Over time a nickname developed in the European Union, calling transportation networks such as these a "ring road". This is no surprise as Europe has several famous "ring roads" such as the Berliner Ring, the Brussels Ring, the Amsterdam Ring, the Boulevard Périphérique around Paris and the Leeds Inner and Outer ring roads. Other countries adopted the term as well which in turn made the name go international. Australia's Melbourne's Western Ring Road and India's Hyderabad's Outer Ring Road both adopted the name. However in Canada, the term is most commonly used, with "orbital" used to a much lesser extent.   On the contrary, the United States calls many "ring roads" as belt-lines, beltways, or loops instead. For example, the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. Some ring roads use terminology such as "Inner Loop" and "Outer Loop". This is, of course, for the sake of directional sense, since compass directions cannot be determined around the entire loop.

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

In today's popular culture, recreational vehicles struggle to find their own niche. Travel trailers or mobile home with limited living facilities, or where people can camp or stay have been referred to as trailers. Previously, many would refer to such vehicles as towable trailers.

Ultra light trucks are very easy to spot or acknowledge if you are paying attention. They are often produced variously such as golf cars, for instance, it has internal combustion or a battery electric drive. They usually for off-highway use on estates, golf courses, parks, in stores, or even someone in an electric wheelchair. While clearly not suitable for highway usage, some variations may be licensed as slow speed vehicles. The catch is that they may on operate on streets, usually a body variation of a neighborhood electric vehicle. A few manufacturers produce specialized chassis for this type of vehicle. Meanwhile, Zap Motors markets a version of the xebra electric tricycle. Which, believe it or not, is able to attain a general license in the United States as a motorcycle.

Many people are familiar with this type of moving, using truck rental services, or borrowing similar hardware, is known as DIY moving. Whoever is renting a truck or trailer large enough to carry their household goods may obtain moving equipment if necessary. Equipment may be items such as dollies, furniture pads, and cargo belts to protect furniture and to ease the moving process.