New Jersey Movers Top Rated

(888) 787-7813

495 Movers in New Jersey

Sponsored

LAST REVIEW

10 5 1 Reviewed 10 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Lisa

DO NOT USE THIS COMPANY UNLESS YOU DON'T WANT YOUR STUFF! Several pieces of Antique furniture were left behind or are completely missing. Was told everything would be moved. Was quoted one price. After being loaded our belongings were held hostage as the price tripled. Need to pay cash or cashiers check before they would start unloading. Credit Cards are not accepted!! Took 3 days for the truck to arrive from Maryland to Savannah. Was assured only our stuff would be on the truck. The truck that arrived in Savannah was not the same truck that picked up in Maryland. Someone else's stuff was on the truck. The house in Maryland was inspected after the movers left. This is when we learned what was left behind. Days later we are learning what has disappeared. They are just gone! Took pics for the movers and company. No one has responded.

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

9 5 1 Reviewed 9 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Lily Carter

Direct Movers were awesome! I appreciated the phone call that they were on their way. Their courteousness, their efficiency, their quick pace to complete the job. Movers were professional from the beginning to the end. Very happy with the services!

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

8 5 1 Reviewed 8 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Quinta Elianora

Eagle van lines really took me out of a huge emergency! I had a move planned out, and my moving company did not show up, after explaining my situation to Eagle Van Lines they were friendly enough to help me out! I could not believe the great customer service I was provided with this company throughout my whole move the best Eagle Van Lines!

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

8 5 1 Reviewed 8 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Hasan

I repeat DO NOT DO NOT use they services they are horrible full shit RAY is full of shit also . They never called me back like they said to let me know what time they coming had to go find a uhaul at the last min.. I see why they got a -1 for rating FUCK IC moving company and they mother ....................

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

7 5 1 Reviewed 7 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Sam

Ali, Jenn, Amber and the entire company is full of frauds. I have already filed a complaint against them with BBB and NJ court.

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

7 5 1 Reviewed 7 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Jake

We moved about a month ago. The owner did not listen to instruction, showed up understaffed and broke a computer monitor that I paid a lot of money for. Plus, his staff rummaged through the family's personal belongings. He completely didn't stand by his work. I would not recommend this company.

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

6 5 1 Reviewed 6 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Stephanie Hunt and Howie Reed Jr

It's SCARY to Honestly See How Much They Took From Us How MUCH they Damaged or "Misplaced" Not To Mention How They Treated Us During This Horrible Ordeal And How Much Care and Compassion They Really Showed Us Our Belongings, Memories IM SAYING 93% UNCONSCIONABLE from the Minute They Showed Up They Showed Their True Intentions and It Continued to The rest of the All The Right Movers Company Despicable (1employeed seemed genuine a 2nd not at first then changed until he went away)

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

6 5 1 Reviewed 6 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Erez

I moved with beast coast moving , they were very good the move was Smoothly , I will definitely recommend.

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Elias Vieira

Used Harrington Movers 3 times in the last 10 years and every single move was smooth and stress free...5 STARS

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Anita

Hired White Glove for a move from NJ to CA. If I ever move back I don't know who I'll choose! This is the first time I've ever used a moving company and having a bunch of guys come to your house and pack and do all the heavy lifting is AWESOME!

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Jonathan Merchant

I had an excellent experience from start to finish with these movers. The staff was professional and friendly, both the office staff and the movers. They only sent two guys with the truck to unload so it took a little longer to unpack than on the pickup, but they worked hard and everything arrived in great condition.

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Aviad Meitar

This was my second oversees move with Bestguy moving and it was great. Everything went very smoothly, timely and professionally. I highly recommend using this company.

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - abbe hill

They were very expensive and I feel overcharged me. Not reputable. Gave me no receipt yet charged more than other moving companies. Very uphappy with there service. Will never use again and do not recommend them

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - David Gordon

I moved from New Jersey to Miami with this company. From Adrian the Sales/Consultant to the movers in NJ - led by Ionut & his band of guys - to the movers in Florida - led by Elad & his guys - I received absolutely top service. I was blown away. They boxed up a glass curio cabinet as part of their service - where another firm wanted $425 for that alone! The company kept me apprised every step of the way; and truly, they went out of their way to accommodate my schedule. The price was the price: no games. I would recommend this company to anyone. Blown away by such customer service.

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Ben M

We used Sterling again less than two years later (we really need to stop moving) - the service was equally as great. They are a superb moving company. First class all the way!

United States New Jersey

Check Out These Great New Jersey Movers

Read our interstate New Jersey moving reviews to find the best cross country mover. After searching through our list of New Jersey interstate movers, the task of finding a reputable state to state moving company won't seem so daunting. The best NJ moving companies are sometimes found in local moving company reviews, so don't forget to check those out as well. Let Moving Authority give you a free moving quote. Once you have a New Jersey movers cost estimate, you'll be able to create a budget and get started on your move.

NJ moving company reviews are available to help you find an American moving company. When you want to move your furniture or have the best car transport in New Jersey, look no further. Free moving estimates are always attainable with our quote generator. For information about New Jersey long distance movers, local movers, and self service movers, you're in the right place. Scope out a moving cost estimate today, and see how easy your move can be with Moving Authority.

The moving companies NJ advertises as the best are usually your best bet for moving companies in NJ. However, to have the top NJ moving experience, it's recommended to check New Jersey movers reviews. Moving companies New Jersey locals say are worth the money can be found here in peer reviews. Choose your moving company NJ today and get moving!

Confused About the Etiquette of Tipping Movers?

  • The question of whether or not to tip movers is hotly debated in this day and age.
  • Some argue that movers make a wage from their moving companies and should not need a tip, however the fact of the matter is that wages for movers can be low. Giving them a tip is not paying them extra out of your pocket, but showing them gratitude for a job well done.
  • Many people are unsure of how much is appropriate to tip, and there’s really no flat standard as far as gratuities are concerned.
  • Factors for the tip include: the level of service you received, how intensive your moving job was, the amount of movers required, the amount of time it took.
  • Ultimately, the decision whether or not to tip falls on your shoulders, and the most basic formula for tipping is to give 5%-10% of the total cost of the move.



4 Things To Consider When Estimating the Cost of Your Home Move



The 5 Most Common Reasons For That Increased Moving Price

  • Sometimes, customers receive moving quotes that don’t quite encompass everything you require from a moving company.
  • This is no one’s fault, simply a misunderstanding between the customer and the representative from the moving company in NJ that issued the quote.
  • If you miscalculate how much stuff you’ll be moving, the price can go up with the added weight.
  • A lot of customers don’t realize that when a New Jersey mover has to use stairs or elevators, this can take extra time and, in turn, cost more money in hourly labor charges.
  • Reputable moving companies in New Jersey insured their customers’ items at sixty cents per pound, but you can also choose full value insurance on your items for an additional fee, which is something that can raise your price.
  • If you suddenly request your movers to unpack your boxes, you’ll be paying for extra labor.
  • In the event that you’re not there to meet your movers New Jersey at any point in the journey, you will be charged a waiting fee for the time that they were waiting for you, unable to work.



Little-Known Facts for First-Time Military Moves

Do you know?

Do you know quotes

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

As most people have experienced, moving does involve having the appropriate materials. Some materials you might find at home or may be more resourceful to save money while others may choose to pay for everything. Either way materials such as boxes, paper, tape, and bubble wrap with which to pack box-able and/or protect fragile household goods. It is also used to consolidate the carrying and stacking on moving day. Self-service moving companies offer another viable option. It involves the person moving buying a space on one or more trailers or shipping containers. These containers are then professionally driven to the new location.

The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

As we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo. Trailers may also be used in a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

The United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number. Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern is highly inconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route. More specifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As it is illustrated in this example, they do not always consistently begin with an even number. However, the 'correct' designation is exemplified in Omaha, Nebraska. In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, which is bypassed by Interstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey. Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

Advocation for better transportation began historically in the late 1870s of the United States. This is when the Good Roads Movement first occurred, lasting all the way throughout the 1920s. Bicyclist leaders advocated for improved roads. Their acts led to the turning of local agitation into the national political movement it became.

In the moving industry, transportation logistics management is incredibly important. Essentially, it is the management that implements and controls efficiency, the flow of storage of goods, as well as services. This includes related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption to meet customer's specifications. Logistics is quite complex but can be modeled, analyzed, visualized, and optimized by simulation software. Generally, the goal of transportation logistics management is to reduce or cut the use of such resources. A professional working in the field of moving logistics management is called a logistician.

Logistics is generally the ability to organize and put in place many complex operations at a single time. It is the management of the flow of things to meet the needs of customers or corporations. Resources managed in logistics includes tangible items such as food, materials, animals, equipment, etc. Not to mention the items that are not tangible such as time and information. This means that the movement of physical items, such as in the moving industry, involves a clear understanding of solid workflow. Such logistics can involve the handling of necessary materials, producing, packaging, inventory, transportation, warehousing, and often security.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.