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2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Marc

“Ronald and his team were excellent. They took g...”

“Ronald and his team were excellent. They took great care of both our things and our house. In the military we move co...”

United States Maryland

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2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sara Bordieri

“Astro movers is amazing!!! Punctual and hard wo...”

“Astro movers is amazing!!! Punctual and hard working!!! They helped move me up 3 flights of stairs with no complaints...”

United States Maryland

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2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Aboud D.

“A couple of years back the floors were being su...”

“A couple of years back the floors were being supplanted in our condo and the designer contracted Blake and Sons to mo...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - GM

“Unimaginably expert and minding staff. No shrou...”

“Unimaginably expert and minding staff. No shrouded shocks, exact snappy appraisal.”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Britney M.

“They are moving us at this moment, and they're ...”

“They are moving us at this moment, and they're awesome! Had additional burden that wouldn't fit in the truck, and the...”

United States Maryland

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2 Reviewed 2 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Thomas H

“Be careful!!! I masterminded a little move with...”

“Be careful!!! I masterminded a little move with Maverick. Not every one of my things arrived. I recorded a police rep...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Maureen K.

“Hands down, the best moving administration I ha...”

“Hands down, the best moving administration I have ever utilized! From beginning to end, everything went easily. I was...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Allan

“What an expert and astonishing association! My ...”

“What an expert and astonishing association! My family moved from a genuinely substantial 4 room home into a 5 room ho...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Tyron M

“Masters: - Guys were amicable - great c...”

“Masters: - Guys were amicable - great client administration - perfect and productive”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - William Smith

“We have worked with Glamor to move 3 times. The...”

“We have worked with Glamor to move 3 times. The folks are incredible to work with and great at what they do. The eval...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Angel Singmore

“I called asking about the administrations they ...”

“I called asking about the administrations they gave. The greater part of my inquiries were replied by a learned indiv...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Serena H

“Ritchie and his group moved a few things for me...”

“Ritchie and his group moved a few things for me yesterday. They were extraordinary. Simple. Strong valuing. Additiona...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - April R

“Approached a Sunday morning ...thinking nobody ...”

“Approached a Sunday morning ...thinking nobody would answer....but express gratitude toward God somebody did answer a...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sharon V.

“This magnificent nearby moving organization has...”

“This magnificent nearby moving organization has been an installation in the region for a considerable length of time....”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Maria ricci

“NYAT is a very good moving company I highly rec...”

“NYAT is a very good moving company I highly recommend them. A++”

United States Maryland

The Best Maryland Movers, See Below

Moving companies in Maryland are everywhere. How do you know when you're choosing the right local movers Maryland has to offer? When looking for the top professional movers Maryland boasts, it's good to know how movers in Maryland are ranked. All the residential movers Maryland has will outshine office movers in Maryland. That doesn't mean those office movers Maryland are nonexistent. Moving companies in MD offer services at every level. Local movers in Maryland cover the towns that are the closest, whereas a long distance moving company in MD takes care of longer relocations.

We have interstate Maryland moving reviews to help you scout out the top Maryland interstate movers. Additionally, we have local moving company reviews, which makes it a snap to find the best Maryland movers. Make sure to get a free moving quote from our online quote generator, which will reveal a Maryland movers cost estimate. You'll be able to decipher discount relocation rates for the best Maryland priced movers. Keep reading! Moving Authority is your place for moving tips, relocation checklists, and guides to make the process smoother.

Finding a trustworthy American moving company isn't as difficult as you may think. With an abundance of Maryland moving company reviews, you can find local movers and self-service movers to move your furniture with ease. But what about Maryland long distance movers? If you're looking for free moving estimates on longer journeys with the best car transport in Maryland, look no further. Get a moving cost estimate today from Moving Authority, completely free of charge. You'll be on your way to a smooth move in no time.

The Price Is Right: HOW TO BUDGET FLAWLESSLY FOR YOUR MOVE

  • First things first: check your bank account. The money you have on hand and in savings won’t magically increase, so your expectations need to be in line with how much you can realistically spend so that you have a safe amount left over.
  • Once you determine how much money you can spare for your move, you need to assess the amount of moving services MD you need. Are you just one person moving? A whole family? A small business? Knowing the level of service you require will help you find a moving company Maryland has on offer to suit your needs.
  • Next up: look at the distance between Point A and Point B.  Are you staying local? Moving from coast to coast? Understanding how far your movers need to go and the time it will take is essential to nailing down an option to fit your price range.
  • Okay, so you’ve identified your price point, the services you need, the distance you’re moving; now you need to research moving companies in the area. Here at Moving Authority, we connect customers with movers all over the USA, as well as provide reviews written by previous customers so that you can know exactly how a moving company operates.
  • Allow a little bit of wiggle room in your budget. You never know when a surprise expense will pop up, and the only way to be prepared for these types of surprises is to be flexible.


4 Secret Spots in Maryland You Have to See For Yourself

  • Betterton Beach—Betterton
  • Lilypons Water Gardens, Adamstown
  • South Mountain Creamery—Middletown
  • Vintage Red Barn—Fulton




Where to Take Kids in Baltimore for the Best Day Ever

  • Terrapin Adventures: from zip lining to climbing towers, your kids will love to run around here.
  • Great Wolf Lodge: rain or shine, this indoor waterpark will make a splash with the kids.
  • Ripley’s Believe It Or not: people of all ages will be astounded by the facts in this branch of the world’s quirkiest museums.
  • Maryland Science Center: your kids will expand their minds while having fun!

3 UNEXPECTED THOUGHTS DURING A MOVE — And How To Combat Them

  • “This will take forever.” If you’re looking at all your stuff and wondering how in the world you’ll get everything sorted and packed in time, don’t stress. If you feel anxiety, the task at hand will feel even more arduous. Do yourself a favor and think of sorting all your things as a fun way to look back at memories. Involve your partner, your family, or your friends and reminisce about all the times you’ve had together with the stuff you’re processing. This way, it doesn’t seem like such a burden to sift through everything you own.
  • “I have ALL THIS stuff?!” Now that you’ve gone through all your things, had some laughs, maybe shed some tears, it’s time to decide what you want to keep and what you want to discard. Memories are priceless, so anything that feels like a part of you should be kept. If you haven’t used an item in 6-12 months, it’s a safe bet that you don’t need it. If you’re still unable to part with a lot of your stuff but you don’t want to move it with you, do yourself a favor and look into storage options with the moving company you choose. This way, you get the best of both worlds: a streamlined move as well as the ability to visit your extra stuff and walk down memory lane anytime you want.
  • “Moving is expensive!” Yes, moving companies MD can cost a lot upfront, but it’s best to look at the big picture when you’re surprised at the cost of your move. Usually, when a person relocates, it’s for a financially lucrative reason (promotion, moving in with a partner, etc). The money you pay for Maryland movers is generally an investment in whatever fiscal advantage you’re setting up for yourself later on.

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Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

In the 20th century, the 1940 film "They Drive by Night" co-starred Humphrey Bogart. He plays an independent driver struggling to become financially stable and economically independent. This is all set during the times of the Great Depression. Yet another film was released in 1941, called "The Gang's All Here". It is a story of a trucking company that's been targeted by saboteurs.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

As most people have experienced, moving does involve having the appropriate materials. Some materials you might find at home or may be more resourceful to save money while others may choose to pay for everything. Either way materials such as boxes, paper, tape, and bubble wrap with which to pack box-able and/or protect fragile household goods. It is also used to consolidate the carrying and stacking on moving day. Self-service moving companies offer another viable option. It involves the person moving buying a space on one or more trailers or shipping containers. These containers are then professionally driven to the new location.

A moving scam is a scam by a moving company in which the company provides an estimate, loads the goods, then states a much higher price to deliver the goods, effectively holding the goods as lien but does this without do a change of order or revised estimate.

Business routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) is an influential association as an advocate for transportation. Setting important standards, they are responsible for publishing specifications, test protocols, and guidelines. All which are used in highway design and construction throughout the United States. Despite its name, the association represents more than solely highways. Alongside highways, they focus on air, rail, water, and public transportation as well.

Truckload shipping is the movement of large amounts of cargo. In general, they move amounts necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or inter-modal container. A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is quite the opposite of a Less than Truckload (LTL) freight services. Less than Truckload shipping services generally mix freight from several customers in each trailer. An advantage Full Truckload shipping carriers have over Less than Truckload carrier services is that the freight isn't handled during the trip. Yet, in an LTL shipment, goods will generally be transported on several different trailers.

The FMCSA has established rules to maintain and regulate the safety of the trucking industry. According to FMCSA rules, driving a goods-carrying CMV more than 11 hours or to drive after having been on duty for 14 hours, is illegal. Due to such heavy driving, they need a break to complete other tasks such as loading and unloading cargo, stopping for gas and other required vehicle inspections, as well as non-working duties such as meal and rest breaks. The 3-hour difference between the 11-hour driving limit and 14 hour on-duty limit gives drivers time to take care of such duties. In addition, after completing an 11 to 14 hour on duty period, the driver much be allowed 10 hours off-duty.

The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

In 1984 the animated TV series The Transformers told the story of a group of extraterrestrial humanoid robots. However, it just so happens that they disguise themselves as automobiles. Their leader of the Autobots clan, Optimus Prime, is depicted as an awesome semi-truck.

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

Some trailers can be towed by an accessible pickup truck or van, which generally need no special permit beyond a regular license. Such examples would be enclosed toy trailers and motorcycle trailers. Specialized trailers like an open-air motorcycle trailer and bicycle trailers are accessible. Some trailers are much more accessible to small automobiles, as are some simple trailers pulled by a drawbar and riding on a single set of axles. Other trailers also have a variety, such as a utility trailer, travel trailers or campers, etc. to allow for varying sizes of tow vehicles.

The term 'trailer' is commonly used interchangeably with that of a travel trailer or mobile home. There are varieties of trailers and manufactures housing designed for human habitation. Such origins can be found historically with utility trailers built in a similar fashion to horse-drawn wagons. A trailer park is an area where mobile homes are designated for people to live in.   In the United States, trailers ranging in size from single-axle dollies to 6-axle, 13 ft 6 in (4,115 mm) high, 53 ft (16,154 mm) in long semi-trailers is common. Although, when towed as part of a tractor-trailer or "18-wheeler", carries a large percentage of the freight. Specifically, the freight that travels over land in North America.

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").

In the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items to be moved and the distance it will go. Cost is also based on how quickly the items are to be moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.

In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

Advocation for better transportation began historically in the late 1870s of the United States. This is when the Good Roads Movement first occurred, lasting all the way throughout the 1920s. Bicyclist leaders advocated for improved roads. Their acts led to the turning of local agitation into the national political movement it became.

In the moving industry, transportation logistics management is incredibly important. Essentially, it is the management that implements and controls efficiency, the flow of storage of goods, as well as services. This includes related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption to meet customer's specifications. Logistics is quite complex but can be modeled, analyzed, visualized, and optimized by simulation software. Generally, the goal of transportation logistics management is to reduce or cut the use of such resources. A professional working in the field of moving logistics management is called a logistician.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

Unfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers have been portrayed as chauvinists or even worse, serial killers. The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency that is devoted to transportation in the United States. The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel and issue's USDOT Number filing to new carriers. The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.