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2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Grace

“Precisely what you need in movers. Gracious, pr...”

“Precisely what you need in movers. Gracious, proficient, and brisk. They made an astonishing showing and I will 100% ...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Maria ricci

“NYAT is a very good moving company I highly rec...”

“NYAT is a very good moving company I highly recommend them. A++”

United States Maryland

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2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sharon V.

“This magnificent nearby moving organization has...”

“This magnificent nearby moving organization has been an installation in the region for a considerable length of time....”

United States Maryland

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2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Danel H.

“Exceptionally strong moving knowledge at a sens...”

“Exceptionally strong moving knowledge at a sensible cost. Watchful and speedy.”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Jennifer A.

“I'm constructing this in light of the assessmen...”

“I'm constructing this in light of the assessment as it were. I was known as the day of educated by Moyer Senior that ...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Tyron M

“Masters: - Guys were amicable - great c...”

“Masters: - Guys were amicable - great client administration - perfect and productive”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - D K.

“Recently moved from NW Baltimore to Howard Coun...”

“Recently moved from NW Baltimore to Howard County. Working with Jim from the outset was very easy. Jim was very acc...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sylvia C.

“Subsequent to perusing their horrendous surveys...”

“Subsequent to perusing their horrendous surveys, I was somewhat reluctant to dispatch our stuff from San Diego to Haw...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Rex

“Precisely what you need in movers. Gracious, pr...”

“Precisely what you need in movers. Gracious, proficient, and brisk. They made an astonishing showing and I will 100% ...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Meka Kane

“i LOVE WESTERN EXPRESS THAT IVEY AND DANNY ARE ...”

“i LOVE WESTERN EXPRESS THAT IVEY AND DANNY ARE AWESOME !!!!!”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Kim A.

“Perry was great for our turn! Everything was co...”

“Perry was great for our turn! Everything was consistent; we called, got a brief quote and booked for the next week. T...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Elijah W.

“This is an incredible moving company! I exceedi...”

“This is an incredible moving company! I exceedingly prescribe that you call them for your best course of action.”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sue S

“What an extraordinary ordeal we had today! Paul...”

“What an extraordinary ordeal we had today! Paul and his team arrived right on time and buckled down for 11 hours pres...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Missy P.

“Justin, our assessor, made a brilliant showing....”

“Justin, our assessor, made a brilliant showing. He was exceptionally proficient and permitted us to shadow him and po...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sabrina A.

“Mashav Relocation is an extremely dependable mo...”

“Mashav Relocation is an extremely dependable moving administration. They made an incredible showing helping me move s...”

United States Maryland

The Best Maryland Movers, See Below

Moving companies in Maryland are everywhere. How do you know when you're choosing the right local movers Maryland has to offer? When looking for the top professional movers Maryland boasts, it's good to know how movers in Maryland are ranked. All the residential movers Maryland has will outshine office movers in Maryland. That doesn't mean those office movers Maryland are nonexistent. Moving companies in MD offer services at every level. Local movers in Maryland cover the towns that are the closest, whereas a long distance moving company in MD takes care of longer relocations.

We have interstate Maryland moving reviews to help you scout out the top Maryland interstate movers. Additionally, we have local moving company reviews, which makes it a snap to find the best Maryland movers. Make sure to get a free moving quote from our online quote generator, which will reveal a Maryland movers cost estimate. You'll be able to decipher discount relocation rates for the best Maryland priced movers. Keep reading! Moving Authority is your place for moving tips, relocation checklists, and guides to make the process smoother.

Finding a trustworthy American moving company isn't as difficult as you may think. With an abundance of Maryland moving company reviews, you can find local movers and self-service movers to move your furniture with ease. But what about Maryland long distance movers? If you're looking for free moving estimates on longer journeys with the best car transport in Maryland, look no further. Get a moving cost estimate today from Moving Authority, completely free of charge. You'll be on your way to a smooth move in no time.

The Price Is Right: HOW TO BUDGET FLAWLESSLY FOR YOUR MOVE

  • First things first: check your bank account. The money you have on hand and in savings won’t magically increase, so your expectations need to be in line with how much you can realistically spend so that you have a safe amount left over.
  • Once you determine how much money you can spare for your move, you need to assess the amount of moving services MD you need. Are you just one person moving? A whole family? A small business? Knowing the level of service you require will help you find a moving company Maryland has on offer to suit your needs.
  • Next up: look at the distance between Point A and Point B.  Are you staying local? Moving from coast to coast? Understanding how far your movers need to go and the time it will take is essential to nailing down an option to fit your price range.
  • Okay, so you’ve identified your price point, the services you need, the distance you’re moving; now you need to research moving companies in the area. Here at Moving Authority, we connect customers with movers all over the USA, as well as provide reviews written by previous customers so that you can know exactly how a moving company operates.
  • Allow a little bit of wiggle room in your budget. You never know when a surprise expense will pop up, and the only way to be prepared for these types of surprises is to be flexible.


4 Secret Spots in Maryland You Have to See For Yourself

  • Betterton Beach—Betterton
  • Lilypons Water Gardens, Adamstown
  • South Mountain Creamery—Middletown
  • Vintage Red Barn—Fulton




Where to Take Kids in Baltimore for the Best Day Ever

  • Terrapin Adventures: from zip lining to climbing towers, your kids will love to run around here.
  • Great Wolf Lodge: rain or shine, this indoor waterpark will make a splash with the kids.
  • Ripley’s Believe It Or not: people of all ages will be astounded by the facts in this branch of the world’s quirkiest museums.
  • Maryland Science Center: your kids will expand their minds while having fun!

3 UNEXPECTED THOUGHTS DURING A MOVE — And How To Combat Them

  • “This will take forever.” If you’re looking at all your stuff and wondering how in the world you’ll get everything sorted and packed in time, don’t stress. If you feel anxiety, the task at hand will feel even more arduous. Do yourself a favor and think of sorting all your things as a fun way to look back at memories. Involve your partner, your family, or your friends and reminisce about all the times you’ve had together with the stuff you’re processing. This way, it doesn’t seem like such a burden to sift through everything you own.
  • “I have ALL THIS stuff?!” Now that you’ve gone through all your things, had some laughs, maybe shed some tears, it’s time to decide what you want to keep and what you want to discard. Memories are priceless, so anything that feels like a part of you should be kept. If you haven’t used an item in 6-12 months, it’s a safe bet that you don’t need it. If you’re still unable to part with a lot of your stuff but you don’t want to move it with you, do yourself a favor and look into storage options with the moving company you choose. This way, you get the best of both worlds: a streamlined move as well as the ability to visit your extra stuff and walk down memory lane anytime you want.
  • “Moving is expensive!” Yes, moving companies MD can cost a lot upfront, but it’s best to look at the big picture when you’re surprised at the cost of your move. Usually, when a person relocates, it’s for a financially lucrative reason (promotion, moving in with a partner, etc). The money you pay for Maryland movers is generally an investment in whatever fiscal advantage you’re setting up for yourself later on.

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In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

A trailer is not very difficult to categorize. In general, it is an unpowered vehicle towed by a powered vehicle. Trailers are most commonly used for the transport of goods and materials. Although some do enjoy recreational usage of trailers as well. 

In the United States, shipments larger than about 7,000 kg (15,432 lb) are classified as truckload freight (TL). It is more efficient and affordable for a large shipment to have exclusive use of one larger trailer. This is opposed to having to share space on a smaller Less than Truckload freight carrier.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

In the 20th century, the 1940 film "They Drive by Night" co-starred Humphrey Bogart. He plays an independent driver struggling to become financially stable and economically independent. This is all set during the times of the Great Depression. Yet another film was released in 1941, called "The Gang's All Here". It is a story of a trucking company that's been targeted by saboteurs.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

By the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight. When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers are largely unfamiliar with large trucks. As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler's numerous blind spots. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

The most basic purpose of a trailer jack is to lift the trailer to a height that allows the trailer to hitch or unhitch to and from the towing vehicle. Trailer jacks may also be used for the leveling of the trailer during storage. To list a few common types of trailer jacks are A-frame jacks, swivel jacks, and drop-leg jacks. Other trailers, such as horse trailers, have a built-in jack at the tongue for this purpose.

Alongside the many different trailers provided are motorcycle trailers. They are designed to haul motorcycles behind an automobile or truck. Depending on size and capability, some trailer may be able to carry several motorcycles or perhaps just one. They specifically designed this trailer to meet the needs of motorcyclists. They carry motorcycles, have ramps, and include tie-downs. There may be a utility trailer adapted permanently or occasionally to haul one or more motorcycles.

The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

As we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo. Trailers may also be used in a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United States to determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced by the Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges. This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whether being used for commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.   According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States. Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity. Likewise, a load is limited to the space available in the trailer, normally with dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations. FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

Unfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers have been portrayed as chauvinists or even worse, serial killers. The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.

The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.