Maryland Movers Top Rated

(888) 787-7813

263 Movers in Maryland

Sponsored

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - William Smith

“We have worked with Glamor to move 3 times. The...”

“We have worked with Glamor to move 3 times. The folks are incredible to work with and great at what they do. The eval...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Rex

“Precisely what you need in movers. Gracious, pr...”

“Precisely what you need in movers. Gracious, proficient, and brisk. They made an astonishing showing and I will 100% ...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Allan

“What an expert and astonishing association! My ...”

“What an expert and astonishing association! My family moved from a genuinely substantial 4 room home into a 5 room ho...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Maureen K.

“Hands down, the best moving administration I ha...”

“Hands down, the best moving administration I have ever utilized! From beginning to end, everything went easily. I was...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Joanna D.

“Platinum Moving made our turn simple and anxiet...”

“Platinum Moving made our turn simple and anxiety free. Raquel worked with us to ensure all our pre-move needs were me...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - GM

“Unimaginably expert and minding staff. No shrou...”

“Unimaginably expert and minding staff. No shrouded shocks, exact snappy appraisal.”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Yen

“Surpassed desires. Fantastic client administrat...”

“Surpassed desires. Fantastic client administration, superb representatives, first rate follow up and satisfies all gu...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Kim A.

“Perry was great for our turn! Everything was co...”

“Perry was great for our turn! Everything was consistent; we called, got a brief quote and booked for the next week. T...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - janna

“BEST MOVING COMPANY AND AFFORDABLE. Incredible ...”

“BEST MOVING COMPANY AND AFFORDABLE. Incredible client administration, benevolent moving group and high caliber.”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Meka Kane

“i LOVE WESTERN EXPRESS THAT IVEY AND DANNY ARE ...”

“i LOVE WESTERN EXPRESS THAT IVEY AND DANNY ARE AWESOME !!!!!”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Aboud D.

“A couple of years back the floors were being su...”

“A couple of years back the floors were being supplanted in our condo and the designer contracted Blake and Sons to mo...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Danel H.

“Exceptionally strong moving knowledge at a sens...”

“Exceptionally strong moving knowledge at a sensible cost. Watchful and speedy.”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - D K.

“Recently moved from NW Baltimore to Howard Coun...”

“Recently moved from NW Baltimore to Howard County. Working with Jim from the outset was very easy. Jim was very acc...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Sara Bordieri

“Astro movers is amazing!!! Punctual and hard wo...”

“Astro movers is amazing!!! Punctual and hard working!!! They helped move me up 3 flights of stairs with no complaints...”

United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Susan K.

“superb administration. the folks worked vigorou...”

“superb administration. the folks worked vigorously utilizing extraordinary consideration with each piece. not a solit...”

United States Maryland

The Best Maryland Movers, See Below

Moving companies in Maryland are everywhere. How do you know when you're choosing the right local movers Maryland has to offer? When looking for the top professional movers Maryland boasts, it's good to know how movers in Maryland are ranked. All the residential movers Maryland has will outshine office movers in Maryland. That doesn't mean those office movers Maryland are nonexistent. Moving companies in MD offer services at every level. Local movers in Maryland cover the towns that are the closest, whereas a long distance moving company in MD takes care of longer relocations.

We have interstate Maryland moving reviews to help you scout out the top Maryland interstate movers. Additionally, we have local moving company reviews, which makes it a snap to find the best Maryland movers. Make sure to get a free moving quote from our online quote generator, which will reveal a Maryland movers cost estimate. You'll be able to decipher discount relocation rates for the best Maryland priced movers. Keep reading! Moving Authority is your place for moving tips, relocation checklists, and guides to make the process smoother.

Finding a trustworthy American moving company isn't as difficult as you may think. With an abundance of Maryland moving company reviews, you can find local movers and self-service movers to move your furniture with ease. But what about Maryland long distance movers? If you're looking for free moving estimates on longer journeys with the best car transport in Maryland, look no further. Get a moving cost estimate today from Moving Authority, completely free of charge. You'll be on your way to a smooth move in no time.

The Price Is Right: HOW TO BUDGET FLAWLESSLY FOR YOUR MOVE

  • First things first: check your bank account. The money you have on hand and in savings won’t magically increase, so your expectations need to be in line with how much you can realistically spend so that you have a safe amount left over.
  • Once you determine how much money you can spare for your move, you need to assess the amount of moving services MD you need. Are you just one person moving? A whole family? A small business? Knowing the level of service you require will help you find a moving company Maryland has on offer to suit your needs.
  • Next up: look at the distance between Point A and Point B.  Are you staying local? Moving from coast to coast? Understanding how far your movers need to go and the time it will take is essential to nailing down an option to fit your price range.
  • Okay, so you’ve identified your price point, the services you need, the distance you’re moving; now you need to research moving companies in the area. Here at Moving Authority, we connect customers with movers all over the USA, as well as provide reviews written by previous customers so that you can know exactly how a moving company operates.
  • Allow a little bit of wiggle room in your budget. You never know when a surprise expense will pop up, and the only way to be prepared for these types of surprises is to be flexible.


4 Secret Spots in Maryland You Have to See For Yourself

  • Betterton Beach—Betterton
  • Lilypons Water Gardens, Adamstown
  • South Mountain Creamery—Middletown
  • Vintage Red Barn—Fulton




Where to Take Kids in Baltimore for the Best Day Ever

  • Terrapin Adventures: from zip lining to climbing towers, your kids will love to run around here.
  • Great Wolf Lodge: rain or shine, this indoor waterpark will make a splash with the kids.
  • Ripley’s Believe It Or not: people of all ages will be astounded by the facts in this branch of the world’s quirkiest museums.
  • Maryland Science Center: your kids will expand their minds while having fun!

3 UNEXPECTED THOUGHTS DURING A MOVE — And How To Combat Them

  • “This will take forever.” If you’re looking at all your stuff and wondering how in the world you’ll get everything sorted and packed in time, don’t stress. If you feel anxiety, the task at hand will feel even more arduous. Do yourself a favor and think of sorting all your things as a fun way to look back at memories. Involve your partner, your family, or your friends and reminisce about all the times you’ve had together with the stuff you’re processing. This way, it doesn’t seem like such a burden to sift through everything you own.
  • “I have ALL THIS stuff?!” Now that you’ve gone through all your things, had some laughs, maybe shed some tears, it’s time to decide what you want to keep and what you want to discard. Memories are priceless, so anything that feels like a part of you should be kept. If you haven’t used an item in 6-12 months, it’s a safe bet that you don’t need it. If you’re still unable to part with a lot of your stuff but you don’t want to move it with you, do yourself a favor and look into storage options with the moving company you choose. This way, you get the best of both worlds: a streamlined move as well as the ability to visit your extra stuff and walk down memory lane anytime you want.
  • “Moving is expensive!” Yes, moving companies MD can cost a lot upfront, but it’s best to look at the big picture when you’re surprised at the cost of your move. Usually, when a person relocates, it’s for a financially lucrative reason (promotion, moving in with a partner, etc). The money you pay for Maryland movers is generally an investment in whatever fiscal advantage you’re setting up for yourself later on.

Do you know?

Do you know quotes

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

In 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story is loosely based on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

As we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo. Trailers may also be used in a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

“Writer-director James Mottern said he was influenced by nuanced, beloved movies of the 1970s such as "The Last Detail" and "Five Easy Pieces." Mottern said his female trucker character began with a woman he saw at a Southern California truck stop — a "beautiful woman, bleach blonde ... skin tanned to leather walked like a Teamster, blue eyes.” - Paul Brownfield

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) are fundamental to the FMCSA's compliance program. The purpose of the CSA program is to oversee and focus on motor carriers' safety performance. To enforce such safety regulations, the CSA conducts roadside inspections and crash investigations. The program issues violations when instances of noncompliance with CSA safety regulations are exposed.   Unfortunately, the CSA's number of safety investigation teams and state law enforcement partners are rather small in comparison to the millions of CMV companies and commercial driver license (CDL) holders. A key factor in the CSA program is known as the Safety Measurement System (SMS). This system relies on data analysis to identify unsafe companies to arrange them for safety interventions. SMS is incredibly helpful to CSA in finding and holding companies accountable for safety performance.  

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

In 1991 the film "Thelma & Louise" premiered, rapidly becoming a well known movie. Throughout the movie, a dirty and abrasive truck driver harasses the two women during chance encounters. Author Michael Dunne describes this minor character as "fat and ignorant" and "a lustful fool blinded by a delusion of male superiority". Thelma and Louise exact their revenge by feigning interest in him and then blowing up his tanker truck full of gas.

The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

Smoke and the Bandit was released in 1977, becoming the third-highest grossing movie. Following only behind Star Wars Episode IV and Close Encounter of the Third Kind, all three movies making an impact on popular culture. Conveniently, during that same year, CB Bears debuted as well. The Saturday morning cartoon features mystery-solving bears who communicate by CB radio. As the 1970's decade began to end and the 80's broke through, the trucking phenomenon had wade. With the rise of cellular phone technology, the CB radio was no longer popular with passenger vehicles, but, truck drivers still use it today.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency that is devoted to transportation in the United States. The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel and issue's USDOT Number filing to new carriers. The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

There are certain characteristics of a truck that makes it an "off-road truck". They generally standard, extra heavy-duty highway-legal trucks. Although legal, they have off-road features like front driving axle and special tires for applying it to tasks such as logging and construction. The purpose-built off-road vehicles are unconstrained by weighing limits, such as the Libherr T 282B mining truck.

The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

Business routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United States to determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced by the Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges. This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whether being used for commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.   According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States. Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity. Likewise, a load is limited to the space available in the trailer, normally with dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

In 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI) was established as an organization. However, in 1905 the name was changed to the Office Public Records (OPR). The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names. So, the organization's name was changed three more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although it was abolished in 1949. Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.

In 1991 the film "Thelma & Louise" premiered, rapidly becoming a well known movie. Throughout the movie, a dirty and abrasive truck driver harasses the two women during chance encounters. Author Michael Dunne describes this minor character as "fat and ignorant" and "a lustful fool blinded by a delusion of male superiority". Thelma and Louise exact their revenge by feigning interest in him and then blowing up his tanker truck full of gas.

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

The 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name. Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground and was shocked when his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute. The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

Some trailers can be towed by an accessible pickup truck or van, which generally need no special permit beyond a regular license. Such examples would be enclosed toy trailers and motorcycle trailers. Specialized trailers like an open-air motorcycle trailer and bicycle trailers are accessible. Some trailers are much more accessible to small automobiles, as are some simple trailers pulled by a drawbar and riding on a single set of axles. Other trailers also have a variety, such as a utility trailer, travel trailers or campers, etc. to allow for varying sizes of tow vehicles.

Light trucks are classified this way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). These are used by not only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) and are authorized to drive with a driving license for cars. Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.

With the ending of World War I, several developments were made to enhance trucks. Such an example would be by putting pneumatic tires replaced the previously common full rubber versions. These advancements continued, including electric starters, power brakes, 4, 6, and 8 cylinder engines. Closed cabs and electric lighting followed. The modern semi-trailer truck also debuted. Additionally, touring car builders such as Ford and Renault entered the heavy truck market.