Louisiana Movers Top Rated

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2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - ws

“Mind blowing!!! These folks made it simple for ...”

“Mind blowing!!! These folks made it simple for us! Quick, sincere and considerate guaranteeing we were satisfied the ...”

United States Louisiana

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2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sally D.

“Security Van Lines of Colorado Springs made an ...”

“Security Van Lines of Colorado Springs made an amazing showing of moving us! Workers were precise in their cost asses...”

United States Louisiana

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2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Nat C.

“Flowers Transfer moved my family (more than 500...”

“Flowers Transfer moved my family (more than 5000 sf) to the midwest and the administration was remarkable. We had an ...”

United States Louisiana

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2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Derek L

“Best movers ever!!! They are awesome and very f...”

“Best movers ever!!! They are awesome and very fairly priced:) thanks so much for making our move so much easier!”

United States Louisiana

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2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Andy G.

“Brilliant!! These men are diligent employees. T...”

“Brilliant!! These men are diligent employees. They came to awe. Extremely obliging and deferential gathering of folks...”

United States Louisiana

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2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - sarah

“These individuals are the best! They went well ...”

“These individuals are the best! They went well beyond to remain by there delivery's!!!”

United States Louisiana

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Tara P.

“Haggard Moving did a good job.They even altered...”

“Haggard Moving did a good job.They even altered a leg on one of my treasure pieces , like the craftsman Jesus, he spa...”

United States Louisiana

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Scott Centorino

“They provided a good, low quote and got most of...”

“They provided a good, low quote and got most of our stuff there on-time. But when they couldn't fit a few of our piec...”

United States Louisiana

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mary Anne Grosch

“Our moving with Abba was so smooth. They are pr...”

“Our moving with Abba was so smooth. They are proficient and decent. They were cautious with my furniture and possessi...”

United States Louisiana

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - CS Long

“I adore this organization. I have moved a lot.....”

“I adore this organization. I have moved a lot...15 times in the most recent 23 years to be correct and have worked wi...”

United States Louisiana

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Don W.

“We used Bridges Bros to move from Portsmouth to...”

“We used Bridges Bros to move from Portsmouth to Biddeford, Maine. They were on time, everyone knew what to do, and th...”

United States Louisiana

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Shanna A.

“Amazing administration!!! Amid a distressing ti...”

“Amazing administration!!! Amid a distressing time, for example, moving This moving company goes well beyond to ensure...”

United States Louisiana

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - A Jwarr

“Can't say enough in regards to the team who mov...”

“Can't say enough in regards to the team who moved us today. They did an awesome showing, and didn't give any grass a ...”

United States Louisiana

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ricardo A.

“I am so happy I ran with these folks. I could p...”

“I am so happy I ran with these folks. I could plan the move same day and they were speedy, effective and affable. My ...”

United States Louisiana

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Stephan S

“Salaam Joe Movers are evaluated 5-Stars on purp...”

“Salaam Joe Movers are evaluated 5-Stars on purpose. They were prescribed to me by my Realtor who never appears to com...”

United States Louisiana

List Of The Best Louisiana Moving Companies

Finding a cross country mover will involve more planning. We have resources available to help you find the state to state moving company that suits your needs. Look at our list of reputable Louisiana interstate movers, then the next step is a free moving quote. You'll have a Louisiana movers cost estimate, which you can use to find the best Louisiana priced movers.

If you want an American moving company with the most fantastic Louisiana moving company reviews, look no further. Moving Authority is your resource for Louisiana long distance movers and local movers. Free moving estimates are always available to help you plan your relocation. Self service movers can move your furniture, or you can find the best car transport in Louisiana. With Moving Authority on your team, the stress of your move will dissipate. Get a moving cost estimate free of charge today and see what we mean.

THE ULTIMATE PRE-MOVE TO-DO LIST

  • Change your address on all subscriptions, and have your mail forwarded to your new location. Most subscriptions can be managed online, and you can even have your mail forwarded online. Otherwise, pop into any post office to fill out a mail forwarding form.
  • Have all utilities scheduled for transfer a few days before the big move so that you’re never without any essentials like electricity or water when moving to Louisiana.
  • When you switch your subscriptions, make sure to update your bank account information.
  • If you have kids, make sure to transfer their registration in school well before the move.
  • If your move is taking you a long distance and you’re driving yourself, make sure that your car can make the journey safely without stranding you somewhere.
  • Take a look at all your belongings and see if there are things you can bear to let go of. Moving is a wonderful time to downsize and streamline the amount of stuff you own, so when you are packing everything, ask yourself, “Do I need this?”



Eat Your Way Through New Orleans Like a Local

  • Breakfast at Café DuMonde
  • Lunch at Cochon
  • Afternoon snack at Bacchanal
  • Dinner at Brigtsen’s




4 Common Grievances With Movers — And How To Fix Them

  • They broke your things. A moving company is on the hook for any of your items that are damaged. Every reputable company will have a claims department that can take care of your claim for you.
  • Your household goods were put into storage. There are a few different reasons this could happen, like forgetting to pay the bill or if the movers showed up and you weren't there. Communicate with the moving companies Louisiana to resolve the problem.
  • My price increased. This is actually a normal occurence when a quote is given over the phone or online, then your Louisiana moving company shows up and actually assess the moving job on moving day. The best way to avoid this is to request an on-site estimate well before the move.
  • My movers never came! No-show movers are bad, but there's usually a reason. Perhaps they're stuck in traffic, or got pulled over for a random inspection by the USDOT. Give them a call to check the status, and consider choosing movers who have GPS so that traffic jams and getting lost can be avoided.




What You Need to Ask Yourself When Relocating to Louisiana

  • When are you moving? It’s a huge help to get planning as soon as you figure out that you will be moving so that you can scope out the best deals possible.
  • How far are you going? Moving services can be costly, and this is especially true if you’re moving long distance or even if you need a lot of services.
  • Do you have the right tools? This is especially important for DIY movers. An item as simple as a dolly can save time, money, and effort during a relocation.
  • What is your budget? While moving services can cost a lot, it’s important to remember that moving is an investment. You want to make sure all your things get to their destination safely, so it’s best to select a price point for what you can realistically afford and stick to it.
  • Are you flexible? The most popular time to move is over the weekend during the summer months, so if you can move outside of those timeframes, you will be able to take advantage of amazing discounts offered by moving companies.
  • Do you have specialty items? Heavy pieces like pianos, gun safes, refrigerators, and hot tubs need special attention when you're moving. Make sure that you have taken the necessary steps to get these large items moved safely.

Do you know?

Do you know quotes

Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.

A commercial driver's license (CDL) is a driver's license required to operate large or heavy vehicles.

As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

Truckload shipping is the movement of large amounts of cargo. In general, they move amounts necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or inter-modal container. A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is quite the opposite of a Less than Truckload (LTL) freight services. Less than Truckload shipping services generally mix freight from several customers in each trailer. An advantage Full Truckload shipping carriers have over Less than Truckload carrier services is that the freight isn't handled during the trip. Yet, in an LTL shipment, goods will generally be transported on several different trailers.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

In 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI) was established as an organization. However, in 1905 the name was changed to the Office Public Records (OPR). The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names. So, the organization's name was changed three more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although it was abolished in 1949. Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

The 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name. Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground and was shocked when his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute. The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

By the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight. When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers are largely unfamiliar with large trucks. As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler's numerous blind spots. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

The most basic purpose of a trailer jack is to lift the trailer to a height that allows the trailer to hitch or unhitch to and from the towing vehicle. Trailer jacks may also be used for the leveling of the trailer during storage. To list a few common types of trailer jacks are A-frame jacks, swivel jacks, and drop-leg jacks. Other trailers, such as horse trailers, have a built-in jack at the tongue for this purpose.

Driver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Union in order to for the complex rules to all member states. Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat. Licences first acquired after 1997, the weight was reduced to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.

Words have always had a different meaning or have been used interchangeably with others across all cultures. In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles. Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.