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118 Movers in Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Elaine

“Markese and his helpers were great at getting u...”

“Markese and his helpers were great at getting us from Moline, IL to Arden Hills, MN. They were organized, professiona...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Victor

“Awesome!”

“Awesome!”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Clare F

“These folks were magnificent! Presently, I don'...”

“These folks were magnificent! Presently, I don't utilize the "a-word" to portray a great deal of administrations, how...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Levi D.

“Agreeable, speedy, supportive. Five star! Will ...”

“Agreeable, speedy, supportive. Five star! Will prescribe to the greater part of my family and companions!”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jeremy S

“This is my first time moving and we were extrem...”

“This is my first time moving and we were extremely worried. Had an incredible move, one and only scratch on a work ar...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - CAROL L SCHIPPERS

“Hard working-family company. Came out and gave...”

“Hard working-family company. Came out and gave me estimate, then 5 days later moved my belongings from townhouse to ...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Becky H

“We employed Mountain Moving to move a fabulous ...”

“We employed Mountain Moving to move a fabulous piano that we had obtained. They were proficient consistently, first t...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Catherine L

“We work at a senior group and dependably call o...”

“We work at a senior group and dependably call of Nathan and his gathering! Legitimate, pleasant and dependably puts o...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Benjamin W.

“From painstakingly wrapping my furniture to off...”

“From painstakingly wrapping my furniture to offering me some assistance with unloading at a storeroom. I'm in wonderm...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jean R.

“Most prominent movers, easily. Extraordinary st...”

“Most prominent movers, easily. Extraordinary state of mind, awesome hard working attitude and reasonable on the cost.”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Taylor T.

“My sweetheart and I utilized Brouwer Relocation...”

“My sweetheart and I utilized Brouwer Relocation surprisingly around two weeks back moving from a condo (1 room, 1 sho...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sean Everett

“My wife and I had an awesome experience with T...”

“My wife and I had an awesome experience with Triple 7 Movers. They saved our day when another moving service cancell...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ricardo O.

“Extraordinary moving company. The moving fo...”

“Extraordinary moving company. The moving folks were extremely cautious with our furniture and TV and wrapped ever...”

United States Iowa

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Leslie

“Would Recommend 2 men and a truck, they spared ...”

“Would Recommend 2 men and a truck, they spared me a considerable measure of cerebral pain, they were incredible folks...”

United States Iowa

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United States Iowa

Find The Best Iowa Moving Companies 

A cross country mover can find the best Iowa interstate movers here with just a few clicks. Local moving company reviews are ideal for customers moving within Iowa, and discount relocation rates can be found with our help. When you get your free moving quote from Moving Authority, you'll have a comprehensive Iowa movers cost estimate. You can use this to pick out the best Iowa priced movers. For more moving tips, guides, and the best Iowa moving companies, read on.

Have you gotten a moving cost estimate for the best car transport in Iowa? If you need Iowa long distance movers, this is something to consider. Keep this in mind when reading Iowa moving company reviews. Making a full-scale relocation involves more than finding local movers to move your furniture. Because of this, Moving Authority provides free moving estimates. Whether you hire a full-service American moving company or self-service movers, a plan is essential. With a detailed moving cost estimate, you can budget and get the wheels turning on your upcoming move.


Why Hiring Movers Is The Smartest Decision You Can Make




4 THINGS YOU MAY NOT THINK ABOUT WHEN MOVING STATE TO STATE

  • Home and Renter’s Insurance. Be sure to switch your home insurance to the new address, if your provider is a national chain. If not, do the research on home insurance to find a company which operates in your new state.
  • Car Insurance. The same goes for your car. This is especially true if you are driving across the country. It’s bad enough to need to file a claim with your insurance company, and even worse if you find out you aren’t covered!
  • Different laws. More and more federal laws are being transferred to the discretion of the states, and it can be jarring to find out that something you may be used to in your old state is illegal in your new state. Read up on how various laws can be different between Point A and Point B.
  • Different social climate. There’s a huge difference between the 24-hour bodega in NYC and the Mom-and-Pop corner store in the sticks of Wyoming. Make sure you understand how the people and attitudes of your new home can be different than what you’re used to so that the moving Iowa culture shock isn't as shocking.

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HOUSE MOVERS IN IOWA and Pets

  • While most movers are animal lovers, your pets can actually hinder the moving process on your move to Iowa.
  • It’s best to check ahead with your movers if you have a cat, because cat allergies are very common.
  • Moving companies Iowa will do everything they can to accommodate the pet in the moving environment.
  • Ultimately, for the safety of your pet, movers will actually take caution and not move as efficiently as possible in order to not harm your furry friend.
  • It’s always best to have someone keep your pet when you’re moving to Iowa, so that the movers can come in and get the job done.


4 Can’t-Miss Kids Activities in Iowa

  • Adventureland Park, Altoona
  • Kings Pointe Waterpark, Storm Lake
  • Blank Park Zoo, Des Moines
  • Play All Day, Sioux City
  • Kids Club at MacNider Museum, Mason City

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The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

"Six Day on the Road" was a trucker hit released in 1963 by country music singer Dave Dudley. Bill Malone is an author as well as a music historian. He notes the song "effectively captured both the boredom and the excitement, as well as the swaggering masculinity that often accompanied long distance trucking."

As most people have experienced, moving does involve having the appropriate materials. Some materials you might find at home or may be more resourceful to save money while others may choose to pay for everything. Either way materials such as boxes, paper, tape, and bubble wrap with which to pack box-able and/or protect fragile household goods. It is also used to consolidate the carrying and stacking on moving day. Self-service moving companies offer another viable option. It involves the person moving buying a space on one or more trailers or shipping containers. These containers are then professionally driven to the new location.

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

There are many different types of trailers that are designed to haul livestock, such as cattle or horses. Most commonly used are the stock trailer, which is enclosed on the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animals in order to allow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horses are hauled with the purpose of attending or participating in competition. Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailers are designed for the comfort and safety of the animals. They're typically well-ventilated with windows and vents along with specifically designed suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit. There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

The industry intends to both consumers as well as moving companies, this is why there are Ministers of Transportation in the industry. They are there to set and maintain laws and regulations in place to create a safer environment. It offers its members professional service training and states the time that movers have been in existence. It also provides them with federal government representation and statistical industry reporting. Additionally, there are arbitration services for lost or damaged claims, publications, public relations, and annual tariff updates and awards. This site includes articles as well that give some direction, a quarterly data summary, and industry trends.

Light trucks are classified this way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). These are used by not only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) and are authorized to drive with a driving license for cars. Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.