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Find A Trustworthy Georgia Moving Company

The art of spotting the top moving companies Georgia isn't always easy to master. It takes a lot of know-how about the moving industry to know how moving companies GA operate. This can be problematic if you've only moved a few times in your lifetime. Yet, here at Moving Authority, we'll bridge the gap between you and quality movers Georgia

Looking for some awesome Atlanta Movers? Education is the key to the best Georgia moving companies. This is also true for discount relocation rates. It's complicated to make a move. Local distance moving company reviews and interstate Georgia moving reviews are helpful. The surefire way to find the best cross country move is to get a free moving quote from what you learn here. This will give you a Georgia movers cost estimate on the best Georgia movers. But the cost for the best Georgia priced movers isn't limited to moving within Georgia. Georgia interstate movers can get the job done if you need a state to state moving company. Keep reading for expert moving tips, checklists, and guides.


Think You Have a ROGUE MOVER? Ask Yourself These Questions.

  • Are they licensed and insured? Check with the FMCSA and the USDOT, as well as the ratings right here at Moving Authority.
  • Have your movers in Georgia explained the charges in detail before you sign the contract?
  • Have previous customers rated this company well?
  • Do the movers in GA seem knowledgeable about the nuances of the moving industry?
  • Does the moving company Georgia have a tariff available for you to see?
  • Are the movers in uniform, energetic, and clean-cut? Lack of professionalism is a sign that you could have a rogue mover on your hands and not a quote mover

Confused About Moving Companies in GA? Check Out These 4 Types.



4 Things You Wouldn’t Believe Can IMPACT YOUR MOVING PRICE

  • Time of the year. Most moves movers will do happen between the months of May and August. When you are planning your relocation, do your best to be flexible. This way, you can take advantage of off-season discounts.
  • Day of the week. If you want a deeply discounted rate, book moving services for a time during the workweek. Moves usually happen on the weekends. Because of this, moving companies are more likely to offer a nice price for the unpopular days of the week to move.
  • Stairs or elevators. If your movers GA have to use stairs or elevators at any point during the move, you'll see an extra fee on your contract.
  • Walking more than 75 feet. If the distance from the moving space to the moving truck is over 75 feet, moving company charges a “long carry fee.” Do what you can to avoid this preventable charge!


Your Next Move: What Steps to Take Before the Big Day

  • Handle the administrative tasks. Don't forget about transferring utilities, changing your address, and updating your bank accounts. Make sure that you arrange to forward your mail to the new address sooner rather than later. You can do this step online via the United States Postal Service or at any post office.
  • Provide the materials. You’ll need boxes and a lot of them. You can pay for top-quality materials, and you can also find many free moving boxes that will get the job done. Along with boxes, you will need strong packing tape, as well as quality filler materials. Moving companies in Georgia will sometimes supply these, but for a fee.
  • Safety first. Be sure to check that all locks work and that windows close in your new place. Also, make sure that the locks have been changed since the previous person lived there. Change the locks yourself if you feel that your new place isn’t secure. The last thing you want when you’re settling in is for someone to have access to your personal space.
  • Clean it up. Ensure that your old place is spic and span before you return the keys to your landlord. Post-move cleanup can feel daunting, especially when you have undertaken a huge move. But, this is crucial to getting you security deposit back and is the right thing to do. Cleaning services might be offered from full-service GA moving companies. It doesn't hurt to ask about this!
  • The driver’s side. This means that you should ensure that your vehicle can make the trip (if it’s a long distance move). Also, you should do what’s necessary to update your information at your new DMV.
  • Do the paperwork. Ensure that you've completed all paperwork so that you are authorized to move into your new place.
  • Pencil it in. Create a schedule for the week leading up to moving day. This will give you a realistic look at how to handle moving tasks, and how much help you may need.

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With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

Business routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

The definition of business logistics can be difficult to understand. Logistics can be simply put as a means of management that plans, implements, and controls the efficiency of the business. The notion of business logistics incorporates all sectors of the industry. It is used as a means to manage the fruition of project life cycles, supply chains, and resultant efficiency.

In the moving industry, transportation logistics management is incredibly important. Essentially, it is the management that implements and controls efficiency, the flow of storage of goods, as well as services. This includes related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption to meet customer's specifications. Logistics is quite complex but can be modeled, analyzed, visualized, and optimized by simulation software. Generally, the goal of transportation logistics management is to reduce or cut the use of such resources. A professional working in the field of moving logistics management is called a logistician.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

By the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight. When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers are largely unfamiliar with large trucks. As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler's numerous blind spots. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

Some trailers can be towed by an accessible pickup truck or van, which generally need no special permit beyond a regular license. Such examples would be enclosed toy trailers and motorcycle trailers. Specialized trailers like an open-air motorcycle trailer and bicycle trailers are accessible. Some trailers are much more accessible to small automobiles, as are some simple trailers pulled by a drawbar and riding on a single set of axles. Other trailers also have a variety, such as a utility trailer, travel trailers or campers, etc. to allow for varying sizes of tow vehicles.

The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency that is devoted to transportation in the United States. The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel and issue's USDOT Number filing to new carriers. The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.