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LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Mary O

“Expert, brief, and individual. They have a fant...”

“Expert, brief, and individual. They have a fantastic demeanor and work VERY difficult to complete your turn precisely...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Joe Dpo

“I must be in my loft for 3 weeks with none of m...”

“I must be in my loft for 3 weeks with none of my furniture or my child's toys. I don't know how they anticipate that ...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - C. W.

“My mother as of late utilized them for a third ...”

“My mother as of late utilized them for a third time - this move into our home. As discouraging as this occasion was f...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sabrina W

“We had an incredible involvement with this orga...”

“We had an incredible involvement with this organization and their costs were reasonable. They permitted us to charge ...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Anique H

“I expected to move rapidly, just before the Tha...”

“I expected to move rapidly, just before the Thanksgiving occasion, and the proprietor bailed me out in my season of n...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Ryan Q.

“Awesome move - the group was quick and endeavor...”

“Awesome move - the group was quick and endeavored to guarantee that everything stayed safe in travel. Would suggest! ...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Bryan L

“Exceptionally proficient a couple issues around...”

“Exceptionally proficient a couple issues around correspondence which wasn't their flaw (he lost his telephone and so ...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Rendon E.

“I know now why they have 5 stars. Had no clue t...”

“I know now why they have 5 stars. Had no clue that there was such an incredible concept as a moving company that is n...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Jeffrey T.

“These folks make an incredible showing! Did our...”

“These folks make an incredible showing! Did our turn without prior warning exceptionally sensible rates. Everything m...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Heath Wetherington

“Damaged property. Owner isn't an honest person ...”

“Damaged property. Owner isn't an honest person and will avoid accountability. DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Julie H.

“These folks are well disposed and speedy. They ...”

“These folks are well disposed and speedy. They are awesome! I unequivocally empower you utilizing these folks. They d...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Kristina C.

“I need to say, by a long shot two of the sweete...”

“I need to say, by a long shot two of the sweetest courteous fellow who moved me (Keith and Greg). They were both expe...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Zedrick A.

“Called these folks a minute ago to get a sofa. ...”

“Called these folks a minute ago to get a sofa. They were super useful and amicable and didn't grumble when the love s...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Charlie Bishop

“John truly bailed me out when we were stuck in ...”

“John truly bailed me out when we were stuck in a tough situation. Our original mover never showed up and John agreed ...”

United States Georgia

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sarah smith

“Don't hire this company, b/c there's a very goo...”

“Don't hire this company, b/c there's a very good chance your items won't make it safely. This driver is extremely re...”

United States Georgia

Find A Trustworthy Georgia Moving Company

The art of spotting the top moving companies Georgia isn't always easy to master. It takes a lot of know-how about the moving industry to know how moving companies GA operate. This can be problematic if you've only moved a few times in your lifetime. Yet, here at Moving Authority, we'll bridge the gap between you and quality movers Georgia

Looking for some awesome Atlanta Movers? Education is the key to the best Georgia moving companies. This is also true for discount relocation rates. It's complicated to make a move. Local distance moving company reviews and interstate Georgia moving reviews are helpful. The surefire way to find the best cross country move is to get a free moving quote from what you learn here. This will give you a Georgia movers cost estimate on the best Georgia movers. But the cost for the best Georgia priced movers isn't limited to moving within Georgia. Georgia interstate movers can get the job done if you need a state to state moving company. Keep reading for expert moving tips, checklists, and guides.


Think You Have a ROGUE MOVER? Ask Yourself These Questions.

  • Are they licensed and insured? Check with the FMCSA and the USDOT, as well as the ratings right here at Moving Authority.
  • Have your movers in Georgia explained the charges in detail before you sign the contract?
  • Have previous customers rated this company well?
  • Do the movers in GA seem knowledgeable about the nuances of the moving industry?
  • Does the moving company Georgia have a tariff available for you to see?
  • Are the movers in uniform, energetic, and clean-cut? Lack of professionalism is a sign that you could have a rogue mover on your hands and not a quote mover

Confused About Moving Companies in GA? Check Out These 4 Types.



4 Things You Wouldn’t Believe Can IMPACT YOUR MOVING PRICE

  • Time of the year. Most moves movers will do happen between the months of May and August. When you are planning your relocation, do your best to be flexible. This way, you can take advantage of off-season discounts.
  • Day of the week. If you want a deeply discounted rate, book moving services for a time during the workweek. Moves usually happen on the weekends. Because of this, moving companies are more likely to offer a nice price for the unpopular days of the week to move.
  • Stairs or elevators. If your movers GA have to use stairs or elevators at any point during the move, you'll see an extra fee on your contract.
  • Walking more than 75 feet. If the distance from the moving space to the moving truck is over 75 feet, moving company charges a “long carry fee.” Do what you can to avoid this preventable charge!


Your Next Move: What Steps to Take Before the Big Day

  • Handle the administrative tasks. Don't forget about transferring utilities, changing your address, and updating your bank accounts. Make sure that you arrange to forward your mail to the new address sooner rather than later. You can do this step online via the United States Postal Service or at any post office.
  • Provide the materials. You’ll need boxes and a lot of them. You can pay for top-quality materials, and you can also find many free moving boxes that will get the job done. Along with boxes, you will need strong packing tape, as well as quality filler materials. Moving companies in Georgia will sometimes supply these, but for a fee.
  • Safety first. Be sure to check that all locks work and that windows close in your new place. Also, make sure that the locks have been changed since the previous person lived there. Change the locks yourself if you feel that your new place isn’t secure. The last thing you want when you’re settling in is for someone to have access to your personal space.
  • Clean it up. Ensure that your old place is spic and span before you return the keys to your landlord. Post-move cleanup can feel daunting, especially when you have undertaken a huge move. But, this is crucial to getting you security deposit back and is the right thing to do. Cleaning services might be offered from full-service GA moving companies. It doesn't hurt to ask about this!
  • The driver’s side. This means that you should ensure that your vehicle can make the trip (if it’s a long distance move). Also, you should do what’s necessary to update your information at your new DMV.
  • Do the paperwork. Ensure that you've completed all paperwork so that you are authorized to move into your new place.
  • Pencil it in. Create a schedule for the week leading up to moving day. This will give you a realistic look at how to handle moving tasks, and how much help you may need.

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Ultra light trucks are very easy to spot or acknowledge if you are paying attention. They are often produced variously such as golf cars, for instance, it has internal combustion or a battery electric drive. They usually for off-highway use on estates, golf courses, parks, in stores, or even someone in an electric wheelchair. While clearly not suitable for highway usage, some variations may be licensed as slow speed vehicles. The catch is that they may on operate on streets, usually a body variation of a neighborhood electric vehicle. A few manufacturers produce specialized chassis for this type of vehicle. Meanwhile, Zap Motors markets a version of the xebra electric tricycle. Which, believe it or not, is able to attain a general license in the United States as a motorcycle.

The intention of a trailer coupler is to secure the trailer to the towing vehicle. It is an important piece, as the trailer couple attaches to the trailer ball. This then forms a ball and socket connection. It allows for relative movement between the towing vehicle and trailer while towing over uneven road surfaces. The trailer ball should be mounted to the rear bumper or to a drawbar, which may be removable. The drawbar secures to the trailer hitch by inserting it into the hitch receiver and pinning it.   The three most common types of couplers used are straight couplers, A-frame couplers, and adjustable couplers. Another option is bumper-pull hitches in which case draw bars can exert a large amount of leverage on the tow vehicle. This makes it harder to recover from a swerving situation (thus it may not be the safest choice depending on your trip).

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

"Six Day on the Road" was a trucker hit released in 1963 by country music singer Dave Dudley. Bill Malone is an author as well as a music historian. He notes the song "effectively captured both the boredom and the excitement, as well as the swaggering masculinity that often accompanied long distance trucking."

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

By the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight. When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers are largely unfamiliar with large trucks. As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler's numerous blind spots. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

Ultra light trucks are very easy to spot or acknowledge if you are paying attention. They are often produced variously such as golf cars, for instance, it has internal combustion or a battery electric drive. They usually for off-highway use on estates, golf courses, parks, in stores, or even someone in an electric wheelchair. While clearly not suitable for highway usage, some variations may be licensed as slow speed vehicles. The catch is that they may on operate on streets, usually a body variation of a neighborhood electric vehicle. A few manufacturers produce specialized chassis for this type of vehicle. Meanwhile, Zap Motors markets a version of the xebra electric tricycle. Which, believe it or not, is able to attain a general license in the United States as a motorcycle.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) is an influential association as an advocate for transportation. Setting important standards, they are responsible for publishing specifications, test protocols, and guidelines. All which are used in highway design and construction throughout the United States. Despite its name, the association represents more than solely highways. Alongside highways, they focus on air, rail, water, and public transportation as well.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation. The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States. The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

The term 'trailer' is commonly used interchangeably with that of a travel trailer or mobile home. There are varieties of trailers and manufactures housing designed for human habitation. Such origins can be found historically with utility trailers built in a similar fashion to horse-drawn wagons. A trailer park is an area where mobile homes are designated for people to live in.   In the United States, trailers ranging in size from single-axle dollies to 6-axle, 13 ft 6 in (4,115 mm) high, 53 ft (16,154 mm) in long semi-trailers is common. Although, when towed as part of a tractor-trailer or "18-wheeler", carries a large percentage of the freight. Specifically, the freight that travels over land in North America.

The industry intends to both consumers as well as moving companies, this is why there are Ministers of Transportation in the industry. They are there to set and maintain laws and regulations in place to create a safer environment. It offers its members professional service training and states the time that movers have been in existence. It also provides them with federal government representation and statistical industry reporting. Additionally, there are arbitration services for lost or damaged claims, publications, public relations, and annual tariff updates and awards. This site includes articles as well that give some direction, a quarterly data summary, and industry trends.

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

Driver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Union in order to for the complex rules to all member states. Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat. Licences first acquired after 1997, the weight was reduced to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.