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LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Jester O.

“Not quite satisfied with this company because t...”

“Not quite satisfied with this company because they charge me with extra and also they charge me to pay the boxes and ...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Dave P.

“The cost and get of merchandise were two highli...”

“The cost and get of merchandise were two highlights of the exchange and their client administration (correspondence t...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 40.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Rockie B.

“The mover at last touches base at 1230, and I t...”

“The mover at last touches base at 1230, and I transfer my discontent to him. He calls the "proprietor", who then says...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sheila Frazier

“If I cold give ZERO stars I would!!! This was a...”

“If I cold give ZERO stars I would!!! This was an awful experience! First, they were the third party of another horrib...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Berry L.

“Try not to USE THIS COMPANY. After many truly o...”

“Try not to USE THIS COMPANY. After many truly off base appraisals and terrible telephone calls from a name changing d...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Dani T.

“Moving is an exceptionally upsetting process......”

“Moving is an exceptionally upsetting process...Tropical Moving made it 200 times worse.....besides not appearing for ...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 40.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Antonio M.

“I am somewhat baffled with the level of adminis...”

“I am somewhat baffled with the level of administration from these movers. I had a truly pleasant seat that they compl...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Becky C.

“The driver continued driving around in circles ...”

“The driver continued driving around in circles despite the fact that he is lost. I got back to the assistant and she ...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - JoAnne I

“This is the third time our family has utilized ...”

“This is the third time our family has utilized Moving Squad and every time it's been a flat out delight! They even mo...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Boby O.

“Awful company all I can say. Please don't use t...”

“Awful company all I can say. Please don't use this company.”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Tommy T

“Good set of guys. Worked 10 hours straight, but...”

“Good set of guys. Worked 10 hours straight, but took care of my stuff with respect.”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Talin D.

“In the event that a moving organization stops t...”

“In the event that a moving organization stops the move and undermines to exit which he did, then you know beyond a sh...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Jim W.

“The most exceedingly terrible moving company I ...”

“The most exceedingly terrible moving company I have ever utilized. Each bit of furniture was scratched, or imprinted ...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Renee M.

“Props to the group at Kiko Moving Company. My 3...”

“Props to the group at Kiko Moving Company. My 3 folks worked, hard! They were neighborly - productive and quick. Much...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Anthony Shuey

“Very professional company from the time we star...”

“Very professional company from the time we started communicating about what my needs were to the movers actually deli...”

United States Florida

Find Professional Florida Moving Companies In a Snap

The ultimate way to find the best Florida moving companies is to read interstate Florida moving reviews. Moving within Florida means that you not only have access to local moving company reviews, but also Florida interstate movers. When most people are looking for an American moving company, they want self service movers or local movers. But, it's more than beneficial to get free moving estimates from Florida long distance movers as well. This way, you're more informed when you read Florida moving company reviews, which helps you make a better decision. We all know that relocating means more than just finding someone to move your furniture. More often than not, it's good to know the company with the best car transport in Florida. Do yourself a favor and get a moving cost estimate today to get your move rolling.


Outsmart the Con Artists: How to Identify ROGUE MOVERS

  • Moving companies in Florida should have an arbitrator, who is a person on staff that can settle any kind of dispute that may arise between customer and company. If your moving company doesn't have one, move to the next company on your list.
  • The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and the United States Department of Transportation regulate the moving industry and vet moving companies. If your company isn't licensed by these government agencies, they are not a legitimate company.
  • Make sure to read the reviews left by previous clients about the company's performance. If the reviews are unsavory, this should be a red flag.
  • Comb over the contract with a fine-tooth comb, so to speak. Have your movers explain everything in detail so that you understand each line item charge. If they refuse to explain, you should refuse to sign.
  • Only pay money for the best movers in Florida. 

Going Far? YOU’LL NEED THIS GUIDE FOR CROSS-COUNTRY MOVING

  • Get planning early. The key to an awesome move is mostly how early and how thoroughly you begin to make a game plan for everything related to your move. When is the best time to start planning? As soon as you know you’re moving. Don’t put this off! Florida moving services don't get any cheaper, so it's best not to wait.
  • Create an inventory. This is essential to understand not just what you will taking and tracking during the move, but it really puts into perspective how much stuff you have and what you can bear to get rid of to streamline your move.
  • Do homework. Schedule time to do research about the options for long-distance movers listed here on Moving Authority. Also, take a look at the logistics and usual practices of a cross-country move so that you can be more educated about how the process works. Check out moving companies Florida to see how much you'll need to budget for your move.
  • Plane or car? Depending on a few different factors (distance, kids, health of your vehicle, etc), it may be less of a hassle to fly to your destination rather than take a road trip. Look into car movers Florida to transport your car.
  • Rest and relaxation. Kicking back and relaxing for a bit may seem like the last thing you should do when you’re faced with such a monumental task, but taking time for yourself really is an important piece of the puzzle. If you’re a frazzled mess, you won’t be able to have a successful move, period. When you’re making your moving schedule, be sure to place room for some “you time.”
  • Take all your valuables with you on your person. This includes expensive items like jewelry, as well as invaluable items like important documents. It’s not that moving companies in FL can’t be trusted, but you don’t want these items to be but in jeopardy of any accidents that may happen.
  • Don’t skimp on your packing materials. You’re going to want sturdy boxes with durable tape, as well as soft material inside like tissue paper or cardboard inserts. Not getting the proper packing materials can mean the difference between everything arriving in one piece and opening up your boxes to find your stuff broken, so be sure to find moving boxes and other materials that will go the distance.
  • Finalize it all. A couple of weeks before tour move, be sure to call the movers in Florida you’ve hired to make sure that your move is on ready, set, go mode.



Little-Known Ways to Find FLORIDA MOVING AND STORAGE

  • More often than not, customers see enticing deals for moving services in ads or online and find that the price listed is not exactly what it seems.
  • A moving company in Florida will usually run advertisements with off-season prices in big, bold fonts in order to draw attention to their services.
  • Most moves happen in the summer months between May and August, and even then, it’s most common for people to move on the weekends rather than take time off in the workweek.
  • The key to being able to utilize these low costs is being flexible with your move. If you can plan to take that discounted rate that just so happens to fall on a Wednesday in the off-season, it’s pretty financially lucrative for you to do so.
  • By taking the off-season time slots, you can save a notable amount of money. This is even more true if you’re moving long-distance and require lots of additional moving services.


The Budget-Friendly Guide to Scoring Free Moving Boxes

  • Ask your grocer. Heavy fruits like apples, oranges and grapefruits come shipped to the store in durable cardboard boxes.
  • Check the liquor store. Alcohol is kept intact during transport in those boxes; who’s to say your breakables won’t, as well?
  • Office spaces. Printer paper is shipped in sturdy boxes that have lids and handles, which are awesome for your household goods.
  • What’s the best way to get these boxes for free? Smile and ask politely. You're already paying for moving services Florida. Don't pay for boxes as well!

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In the 20th century, the 1940 film "They Drive by Night" co-starred Humphrey Bogart. He plays an independent driver struggling to become financially stable and economically independent. This is all set during the times of the Great Depression. Yet another film was released in 1941, called "The Gang's All Here". It is a story of a trucking company that's been targeted by saboteurs.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

As most people have experienced, moving does involve having the appropriate materials. Some materials you might find at home or may be more resourceful to save money while others may choose to pay for everything. Either way materials such as boxes, paper, tape, and bubble wrap with which to pack box-able and/or protect fragile household goods. It is also used to consolidate the carrying and stacking on moving day. Self-service moving companies offer another viable option. It involves the person moving buying a space on one or more trailers or shipping containers. These containers are then professionally driven to the new location.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

A moving scam is a scam by a moving company in which the company provides an estimate, loads the goods, then states a much higher price to deliver the goods, effectively holding the goods as lien but does this without do a change of order or revised estimate.

Business routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

Advocation for better transportation began historically in the late 1870s of the United States. This is when the Good Roads Movement first occurred, lasting all the way throughout the 1920s. Bicyclist leaders advocated for improved roads. Their acts led to the turning of local agitation into the national political movement it became.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

In 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI) was established as an organization. However, in 1905 the name was changed to the Office Public Records (OPR). The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names. So, the organization's name was changed three more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although it was abolished in 1949. Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.

A circumferential route refers to a public transportation system that follows the route in the shape of a circle. Over time a nickname developed in the European Union, calling transportation networks such as these a "ring road". This is no surprise as Europe has several famous "ring roads" such as the Berliner Ring, the Brussels Ring, the Amsterdam Ring, the Boulevard Périphérique around Paris and the Leeds Inner and Outer ring roads. Other countries adopted the term as well which in turn made the name go international. Australia's Melbourne's Western Ring Road and India's Hyderabad's Outer Ring Road both adopted the name. However in Canada, the term is most commonly used, with "orbital" used to a much lesser extent.   On the contrary, the United States calls many "ring roads" as belt-lines, beltways, or loops instead. For example, the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. Some ring roads use terminology such as "Inner Loop" and "Outer Loop". This is, of course, for the sake of directional sense, since compass directions cannot be determined around the entire loop.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

In today's society, there are rules and regulations everywhere you go, the same goes for commercial vehicles. The federal government has strict regulations that must be met, such as how many hours a driver may be on the clock. For example, 11 hours driving /14 hours on-duty followed by 10 hours off, with a max of 70 hours/8 days or 60 hours/7 days. They can also set rules deciding how much rest and sleep time is required, however, these are only a couple of regulations set. Any violations are often subject to harsh penalties. In some cases, there are instruments to track each driver's hours, which are becoming more necessary.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

In the United States, shipments larger than about 7,000 kg (15,432 lb) are classified as truckload freight (TL). It is more efficient and affordable for a large shipment to have exclusive use of one larger trailer. This is opposed to having to share space on a smaller Less than Truckload freight carrier.

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

“Writer-director James Mottern said he was influenced by nuanced, beloved movies of the 1970s such as "The Last Detail" and "Five Easy Pieces." Mottern said his female trucker character began with a woman he saw at a Southern California truck stop — a "beautiful woman, bleach blonde ... skin tanned to leather walked like a Teamster, blue eyes.” - Paul Brownfield

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United States to determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced by the Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges. This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whether being used for commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.   According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States. Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity. Likewise, a load is limited to the space available in the trailer, normally with dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

The definition of business logistics can be difficult to understand. Logistics can be simply put as a means of management that plans, implements, and controls the efficiency of the business. The notion of business logistics incorporates all sectors of the industry. It is used as a means to manage the fruition of project life cycles, supply chains, and resultant efficiency.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").