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2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Mark T.

“So content with 1776 Moving and Storage and wil...”

“So content with 1776 Moving and Storage and will completely prescribe them for everyone!!!! Beyond any doubt won't be...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Thirza B

“Because of a mistake with the location, they we...”

“Because of a mistake with the location, they were late so I wasn't going to survey them. In any case, when they arriv...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Michele H.

“Genuine why all the terrible surveys? These fol...”

“Genuine why all the terrible surveys? These folks and ladies ROCKED IT! Not a break, not a scratch, on time, incredib...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Rain W.

“This is at least somewhat great. We moved from ...”

“This is at least somewhat great. We moved from a second floor stroll up, to capacity, then 2 weeks after the fact int...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Will P.

“It pains me to give Whitehill Moving & Storage ...”

“It pains me to give Whitehill Moving & Storage less than five stars, but I feel the need to advise others of my exper...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Mary G

“Remarkable administration! My last moving backg...”

“Remarkable administration! My last moving background with another organization was a bad dream - such a large number ...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Dyta E.

“They are awesome, inviting and make an extraord...”

“They are awesome, inviting and make an extraordinary showing with regards to. The reason I cannot give them 5 stars i...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Hoon C.

“I was extremely content with them. Their starti...”

“I was extremely content with them. Their starting correspondence wasn't extraordinary. I had rounded out an online st...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Ynna

“Horrible. I've signed the contract with them on...”

“Horrible. I've signed the contract with them on an estimated pick-up between May 20-22. Since I would be relocating ...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - WillyG C

“As an Army minx and Army veteran I've been movi...”

“As an Army minx and Army veteran I've been moving my entire life. This was the first occasion when I obtained an admi...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Desiree D.

“Worst moving company ever! Seriously, I've neve...”

“Worst moving company ever! Seriously, I've never experienced such horrible customer service in my life. No matter how...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Steve D.

“The folks made an awesome showing, and were exc...”

“The folks made an awesome showing, and were exceptionally intensive!! They were cautious with my things and went to a...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Ruth Fraley

“Most professional and competent movers I ever h...”

“Most professional and competent movers I ever hired. Nothing was lost or damaged in a 950 mile plus move. My thing...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Thomas B

“Most exceedingly awful. Organization. EVER. ...”

“Most exceedingly awful. Organization. EVER. Keep away from THIS COMPANY At all costs. My experience was so awful ...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sara

“When I got the order to relocate, I had just 2 ...”

“When I got the order to relocate, I had just 2 weeks to make the move. I never expected I would get my entire family...”

United States Florida

Find Professional Florida Moving Companies In a Snap

The ultimate way to find the best Florida moving companies is to read interstate Florida moving reviews. Moving within Florida means that you not only have access to local moving company reviews, but also Florida interstate movers. When most people are looking for an American moving company, they want self service movers or local movers. But, it's more than beneficial to get free moving estimates from Florida long distance movers as well. This way, you're more informed when you read Florida moving company reviews, which helps you make a better decision. We all know that relocating means more than just finding someone to move your furniture. More often than not, it's good to know the company with the best car transport in Florida. Do yourself a favor and get a moving cost estimate today to get your move rolling.


Outsmart the Con Artists: How to Identify ROGUE MOVERS

  • Moving companies in Florida should have an arbitrator, who is a person on staff that can settle any kind of dispute that may arise between customer and company. If your moving company doesn't have one, move to the next company on your list.
  • The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and the United States Department of Transportation regulate the moving industry and vet moving companies. If your company isn't licensed by these government agencies, they are not a legitimate company.
  • Make sure to read the reviews left by previous clients about the company's performance. If the reviews are unsavory, this should be a red flag.
  • Comb over the contract with a fine-tooth comb, so to speak. Have your movers explain everything in detail so that you understand each line item charge. If they refuse to explain, you should refuse to sign.
  • Only pay money for the best movers in Florida. 

Going Far? YOU’LL NEED THIS GUIDE FOR CROSS-COUNTRY MOVING

  • Get planning early. The key to an awesome move is mostly how early and how thoroughly you begin to make a game plan for everything related to your move. When is the best time to start planning? As soon as you know you’re moving. Don’t put this off! Florida moving services don't get any cheaper, so it's best not to wait.
  • Create an inventory. This is essential to understand not just what you will taking and tracking during the move, but it really puts into perspective how much stuff you have and what you can bear to get rid of to streamline your move.
  • Do homework. Schedule time to do research about the options for long-distance movers listed here on Moving Authority. Also, take a look at the logistics and usual practices of a cross-country move so that you can be more educated about how the process works. Check out moving companies Florida to see how much you'll need to budget for your move.
  • Plane or car? Depending on a few different factors (distance, kids, health of your vehicle, etc), it may be less of a hassle to fly to your destination rather than take a road trip. Look into car movers Florida to transport your car.
  • Rest and relaxation. Kicking back and relaxing for a bit may seem like the last thing you should do when you’re faced with such a monumental task, but taking time for yourself really is an important piece of the puzzle. If you’re a frazzled mess, you won’t be able to have a successful move, period. When you’re making your moving schedule, be sure to place room for some “you time.”
  • Take all your valuables with you on your person. This includes expensive items like jewelry, as well as invaluable items like important documents. It’s not that moving companies in FL can’t be trusted, but you don’t want these items to be but in jeopardy of any accidents that may happen.
  • Don’t skimp on your packing materials. You’re going to want sturdy boxes with durable tape, as well as soft material inside like tissue paper or cardboard inserts. Not getting the proper packing materials can mean the difference between everything arriving in one piece and opening up your boxes to find your stuff broken, so be sure to find moving boxes and other materials that will go the distance.
  • Finalize it all. A couple of weeks before tour move, be sure to call the movers in Florida you’ve hired to make sure that your move is on ready, set, go mode.



Little-Known Ways to Find FLORIDA MOVING AND STORAGE

  • More often than not, customers see enticing deals for moving services in ads or online and find that the price listed is not exactly what it seems.
  • A moving company in Florida will usually run advertisements with off-season prices in big, bold fonts in order to draw attention to their services.
  • Most moves happen in the summer months between May and August, and even then, it’s most common for people to move on the weekends rather than take time off in the workweek.
  • The key to being able to utilize these low costs is being flexible with your move. If you can plan to take that discounted rate that just so happens to fall on a Wednesday in the off-season, it’s pretty financially lucrative for you to do so.
  • By taking the off-season time slots, you can save a notable amount of money. This is even more true if you’re moving long-distance and require lots of additional moving services.


The Budget-Friendly Guide to Scoring Free Moving Boxes

  • Ask your grocer. Heavy fruits like apples, oranges and grapefruits come shipped to the store in durable cardboard boxes.
  • Check the liquor store. Alcohol is kept intact during transport in those boxes; who’s to say your breakables won’t, as well?
  • Office spaces. Printer paper is shipped in sturdy boxes that have lids and handles, which are awesome for your household goods.
  • What’s the best way to get these boxes for free? Smile and ask politely. You're already paying for moving services Florida. Don't pay for boxes as well!

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The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. both politically as well as economically since the notion has begun. Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freight was moved by train or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were first exclusively used by the military during World War I.   After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's. Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service. During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System. The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

"Six Day on the Road" was a trucker hit released in 1963 by country music singer Dave Dudley. Bill Malone is an author as well as a music historian. He notes the song "effectively captured both the boredom and the excitement, as well as the swaggering masculinity that often accompanied long distance trucking."

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

The Federal Bridge Law handles relations between the gross weight of the truck, the number of axles, and the spacing between them. This is how they determine is the truck can be on the Interstate Highway system. Each state gets to decide the maximum, under the Federal Bridge Law. They determine by vehicle in combination with axle weight on state and local roads

The American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association tried numerous moves. One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations. FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

Logistics is generally the ability to organize and put in place many complex operations at a single time. It is the management of the flow of things to meet the needs of customers or corporations. Resources managed in logistics includes tangible items such as food, materials, animals, equipment, etc. Not to mention the items that are not tangible such as time and information. This means that the movement of physical items, such as in the moving industry, involves a clear understanding of solid workflow. Such logistics can involve the handling of necessary materials, producing, packaging, inventory, transportation, warehousing, and often security.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

A Ministry of Transport (or) Transportation is responsible for transportation within a country. Administration usually falls upon the Minister for Transport. The term may also be applied to the departments or other government agencies administering transport in a nation who do not use ministers. There are various and vast responsibilities for agencies to oversee such as road safety. Others may include civil aviation, maritime transport, rail transport and so on. They continue to develop government transportation policy and organize public transit. All while trying to maintain and construct infrastructural projects. Some ministries have additional responsibilities in related policy areas as mentioned above.

Words have always had a different meaning or have been used interchangeably with others across all cultures. In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles. Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

With the ending of World War I, several developments were made to enhance trucks. Such an example would be by putting pneumatic tires replaced the previously common full rubber versions. These advancements continued, including electric starters, power brakes, 4, 6, and 8 cylinder engines. Closed cabs and electric lighting followed. The modern semi-trailer truck also debuted. Additionally, touring car builders such as Ford and Renault entered the heavy truck market.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency that is devoted to transportation in the United States. The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel and issue's USDOT Number filing to new carriers. The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.

Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

In 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

The Federal Bridge Law handles relations between the gross weight of the truck, the number of axles, and the spacing between them. This is how they determine is the truck can be on the Interstate Highway system. Each state gets to decide the maximum, under the Federal Bridge Law. They determine by vehicle in combination with axle weight on state and local roads

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations. FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

Logistics is generally the ability to organize and put in place many complex operations at a single time. It is the management of the flow of things to meet the needs of customers or corporations. Resources managed in logistics includes tangible items such as food, materials, animals, equipment, etc. Not to mention the items that are not tangible such as time and information. This means that the movement of physical items, such as in the moving industry, involves a clear understanding of solid workflow. Such logistics can involve the handling of necessary materials, producing, packaging, inventory, transportation, warehousing, and often security.

The FMCSA has established rules to maintain and regulate the safety of the trucking industry. According to FMCSA rules, driving a goods-carrying CMV more than 11 hours or to drive after having been on duty for 14 hours, is illegal. Due to such heavy driving, they need a break to complete other tasks such as loading and unloading cargo, stopping for gas and other required vehicle inspections, as well as non-working duties such as meal and rest breaks. The 3-hour difference between the 11-hour driving limit and 14 hour on-duty limit gives drivers time to take care of such duties. In addition, after completing an 11 to 14 hour on duty period, the driver much be allowed 10 hours off-duty.

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

By the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight. When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers are largely unfamiliar with large trucks. As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler's numerous blind spots. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.