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2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Thirza B

“Because of a mistake with the location, they we...”

“Because of a mistake with the location, they were late so I wasn't going to survey them. In any case, when they arriv...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Tristan W.

“Awful, shocking background with these folks. I ...”

“Awful, shocking background with these folks. I won't dive into every one of the points of interest, yet I would by no...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Tammy Wilkie

“I as of late had a long separation move and hav...”

“I as of late had a long separation move and having moved a few times in the past this was unquestionably the best exp...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Michele H.

“Genuine why all the terrible surveys? These fol...”

“Genuine why all the terrible surveys? These folks and ladies ROCKED IT! Not a break, not a scratch, on time, incredib...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Garry L.

“Indeed, well, well. I am astounded that these f...”

“Indeed, well, well. I am astounded that these folks don't have any surveys. Hang on - they are sifted! Surmise they d...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Dyta E.

“They are awesome, inviting and make an extraord...”

“They are awesome, inviting and make an extraordinary showing with regards to. The reason I cannot give them 5 stars i...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sophia E.

“American Van Service are sensibly valued, auspi...”

“American Van Service are sensibly valued, auspicious and exceptionally watchful moving your stuff. They were prescrib...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Maria Fe P.

“They milked the move to the point where I start...”

“They milked the move to the point where I started helping the movers just so that I could finish the job. Their servi...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Ruth Fraley

“Most professional and competent movers I ever h...”

“Most professional and competent movers I ever hired. Nothing was lost or damaged in a 950 mile plus move. My thing...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Ryan P.

“The group was anything but difficult to work wi...”

“The group was anything but difficult to work with, however not exceptionally effective. In the first place, they dest...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Ynna

“Horrible. I've signed the contract with them on...”

“Horrible. I've signed the contract with them on an estimated pick-up between May 20-22. Since I would be relocating ...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Desiree D.

“Worst moving company ever! Seriously, I've neve...”

“Worst moving company ever! Seriously, I've never experienced such horrible customer service in my life. No matter how...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Rain W.

“This is at least somewhat great. We moved from ...”

“This is at least somewhat great. We moved from a second floor stroll up, to capacity, then 2 weeks after the fact int...”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Kevin

“best move ever!”

“best move ever!”

United States Florida

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Mark T.

“So content with 1776 Moving and Storage and wil...”

“So content with 1776 Moving and Storage and will completely prescribe them for everyone!!!! Beyond any doubt won't be...”

United States Florida

Find Professional Florida Moving Companies In a Snap

The ultimate way to find the best Florida moving companies is to read interstate Florida moving reviews. Moving within Florida means that you not only have access to local moving company reviews, but also Florida interstate movers. When most people are looking for an American moving company, they want self service movers or local movers. But, it's more than beneficial to get free moving estimates from Florida long distance movers as well. This way, you're more informed when you read Florida moving company reviews, which helps you make a better decision. We all know that relocating means more than just finding someone to move your furniture. More often than not, it's good to know the company with the best car transport in Florida. Do yourself a favor and get a moving cost estimate today to get your move rolling.


Outsmart the Con Artists: How to Identify ROGUE MOVERS

  • Moving companies in Florida should have an arbitrator, who is a person on staff that can settle any kind of dispute that may arise between customer and company. If your moving company doesn't have one, move to the next company on your list.
  • The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and the United States Department of Transportation regulate the moving industry and vet moving companies. If your company isn't licensed by these government agencies, they are not a legitimate company.
  • Make sure to read the reviews left by previous clients about the company's performance. If the reviews are unsavory, this should be a red flag.
  • Comb over the contract with a fine-tooth comb, so to speak. Have your movers explain everything in detail so that you understand each line item charge. If they refuse to explain, you should refuse to sign.
  • Only pay money for the best movers in Florida. 

Going Far? YOU’LL NEED THIS GUIDE FOR CROSS-COUNTRY MOVING

  • Get planning early. The key to an awesome move is mostly how early and how thoroughly you begin to make a game plan for everything related to your move. When is the best time to start planning? As soon as you know you’re moving. Don’t put this off! Florida moving services don't get any cheaper, so it's best not to wait.
  • Create an inventory. This is essential to understand not just what you will taking and tracking during the move, but it really puts into perspective how much stuff you have and what you can bear to get rid of to streamline your move.
  • Do homework. Schedule time to do research about the options for long-distance movers listed here on Moving Authority. Also, take a look at the logistics and usual practices of a cross-country move so that you can be more educated about how the process works. Check out moving companies Florida to see how much you'll need to budget for your move.
  • Plane or car? Depending on a few different factors (distance, kids, health of your vehicle, etc), it may be less of a hassle to fly to your destination rather than take a road trip. Look into car movers Florida to transport your car.
  • Rest and relaxation. Kicking back and relaxing for a bit may seem like the last thing you should do when you’re faced with such a monumental task, but taking time for yourself really is an important piece of the puzzle. If you’re a frazzled mess, you won’t be able to have a successful move, period. When you’re making your moving schedule, be sure to place room for some “you time.”
  • Take all your valuables with you on your person. This includes expensive items like jewelry, as well as invaluable items like important documents. It’s not that moving companies in FL can’t be trusted, but you don’t want these items to be but in jeopardy of any accidents that may happen.
  • Don’t skimp on your packing materials. You’re going to want sturdy boxes with durable tape, as well as soft material inside like tissue paper or cardboard inserts. Not getting the proper packing materials can mean the difference between everything arriving in one piece and opening up your boxes to find your stuff broken, so be sure to find moving boxes and other materials that will go the distance.
  • Finalize it all. A couple of weeks before tour move, be sure to call the movers in Florida you’ve hired to make sure that your move is on ready, set, go mode.



Little-Known Ways to Find FLORIDA MOVING AND STORAGE

  • More often than not, customers see enticing deals for moving services in ads or online and find that the price listed is not exactly what it seems.
  • A moving company in Florida will usually run advertisements with off-season prices in big, bold fonts in order to draw attention to their services.
  • Most moves happen in the summer months between May and August, and even then, it’s most common for people to move on the weekends rather than take time off in the workweek.
  • The key to being able to utilize these low costs is being flexible with your move. If you can plan to take that discounted rate that just so happens to fall on a Wednesday in the off-season, it’s pretty financially lucrative for you to do so.
  • By taking the off-season time slots, you can save a notable amount of money. This is even more true if you’re moving long-distance and require lots of additional moving services.


The Budget-Friendly Guide to Scoring Free Moving Boxes

  • Ask your grocer. Heavy fruits like apples, oranges and grapefruits come shipped to the store in durable cardboard boxes.
  • Check the liquor store. Alcohol is kept intact during transport in those boxes; who’s to say your breakables won’t, as well?
  • Office spaces. Printer paper is shipped in sturdy boxes that have lids and handles, which are awesome for your household goods.
  • What’s the best way to get these boxes for free? Smile and ask politely. You're already paying for moving services Florida. Don't pay for boxes as well!

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In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

In 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

As we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo. Trailers may also be used in a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

In the moving industry, transportation logistics management is incredibly important. Essentially, it is the management that implements and controls efficiency, the flow of storage of goods, as well as services. This includes related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption to meet customer's specifications. Logistics is quite complex but can be modeled, analyzed, visualized, and optimized by simulation software. Generally, the goal of transportation logistics management is to reduce or cut the use of such resources. A professional working in the field of moving logistics management is called a logistician.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

In 1984 the animated TV series The Transformers told the story of a group of extraterrestrial humanoid robots. However, it just so happens that they disguise themselves as automobiles. Their leader of the Autobots clan, Optimus Prime, is depicted as an awesome semi-truck.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

A Ministry of Transport (or) Transportation is responsible for transportation within a country. Administration usually falls upon the Minister for Transport. The term may also be applied to the departments or other government agencies administering transport in a nation who do not use ministers. There are various and vast responsibilities for agencies to oversee such as road safety. Others may include civil aviation, maritime transport, rail transport and so on. They continue to develop government transportation policy and organize public transit. All while trying to maintain and construct infrastructural projects. Some ministries have additional responsibilities in related policy areas as mentioned above.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

In the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items to be moved and the distance it will go. Cost is also based on how quickly the items are to be moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

In the 20th century, the 1940 film "They Drive by Night" co-starred Humphrey Bogart. He plays an independent driver struggling to become financially stable and economically independent. This is all set during the times of the Great Depression. Yet another film was released in 1941, called "The Gang's All Here". It is a story of a trucking company that's been targeted by saboteurs.

As most people have experienced, moving does involve having the appropriate materials. Some materials you might find at home or may be more resourceful to save money while others may choose to pay for everything. Either way materials such as boxes, paper, tape, and bubble wrap with which to pack box-able and/or protect fragile household goods. It is also used to consolidate the carrying and stacking on moving day. Self-service moving companies offer another viable option. It involves the person moving buying a space on one or more trailers or shipping containers. These containers are then professionally driven to the new location.

During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

As we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo. Trailers may also be used in a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) is an influential association as an advocate for transportation. Setting important standards, they are responsible for publishing specifications, test protocols, and guidelines. All which are used in highway design and construction throughout the United States. Despite its name, the association represents more than solely highways. Alongside highways, they focus on air, rail, water, and public transportation as well.

In the moving industry, transportation logistics management is incredibly important. Essentially, it is the management that implements and controls efficiency, the flow of storage of goods, as well as services. This includes related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption to meet customer's specifications. Logistics is quite complex but can be modeled, analyzed, visualized, and optimized by simulation software. Generally, the goal of transportation logistics management is to reduce or cut the use of such resources. A professional working in the field of moving logistics management is called a logistician.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

The industry intends to both consumers as well as moving companies, this is why there are Ministers of Transportation in the industry. They are there to set and maintain laws and regulations in place to create a safer environment. It offers its members professional service training and states the time that movers have been in existence. It also provides them with federal government representation and statistical industry reporting. Additionally, there are arbitration services for lost or damaged claims, publications, public relations, and annual tariff updates and awards. This site includes articles as well that give some direction, a quarterly data summary, and industry trends.

The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.