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Small City Living With a Big City Feel:
Carrollton, TX


  1. Texas is a Big State with a Small Town
  2. Why Move to Small Town Carrollton?
  3. Job Opportunities Carrollton Has to Offer Its Potential Residents
  4. Carrollton's Educational System
  5. These Factors May Make You Think 2x About Moving to Carrollton
 Living in Carrollton TX

1. Texas is a Big State with Small Town

Carrollton is a small city in Texas. The city is located in the Dallas metropolitan area and has surprised many people who chose to move to Carrollton. The city was voted one of the top 20 best small towns in America by Money magazine. The city actually has a lot to offer, although it may not seem like it at first. There are a lot of benefits to living in a smaller city such as Carrollton. Texas seems to be a hot spot for people with San Antonio, Houston, and Austin all making it on our list of the best places to live in in the United States.

2. Why Move to Small Town Carrollton?

Many people are moving to Carrollton in order to get away from the busy and congested city life. Others have chosen to move to Carrollton for work; these people often choose to live quite home lives but still find it favorable to work in a larger city. Some residents even make the commute to larger cities, such as Dallas, for work. There is a certain conjunction of work and fun that is to be found in Carrollton. If the city ever feels small, many current residents can simply hop on a train and be in Dallas in a matter of minutes. There are also freeways for Carrollton residents who prefer to get themselves where they need to go.

The climate of Carrollton is the embodiment of what it feels like to live in Texas. It is always very hot. The only time residents can enjoy some relief is during the winter, when temperatures fall to near freezing during the nighttime hours.

Not many people live in Carrollton. However, it is part of the fourth largest metropolitan area in the United States. This is a major contributing factor for why many people are moving to Carrollton in recent years.

3. Job Opportunities Carrollton Has to Offer Its Potential Residents 

Because of the rather small population, there are plenty of jobs available in Carrollton. The massive healthcare and tech industry professions have overtaken much of the job market in this area of Texas. The smaller economy makes it more manageable as well as stable. Carrollton residents can take all of their hard-earned money and spend it at the Dallas shopping mall. It is a short drive away from Carrollton by the freeway, or you can take the train. This area is serviced by the Dallas Area Rapid Transit system, which is a combination of light rail lines and bus routes. This system makes Dallas just a short 45-minute train ride away.

4. Carrollton's Educational System

Education is a major strong point in Carrollton, much like it is in other cities of Texas. People who move to Carrollton can choose from one of many higher education learning facilities both near the city as well as a short commute away. There are community colleges as well as four-year universities. Carrollton is also known for having a great K-12 district, with a low teacher to student ratio.

5. These Factors May Make You Think 2x About Moving to Carrollton 

The home market in Carrollton is steady thanks to the strong economy. This makes finding the right neighborhood and home easier than ever. Moving to Carrollton is something that you should seriously take in into consideration, especially if you love small town charm with big city amenities. There are many reasons people move to new cities, however, there is a lot more to consider when moving to Carrolton. 

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