Logo
Logo

International Shipping Guide

International Shipping Guide

  1. Going International: The Basics
  2. Shipper
  3. Shipping Company
  4. Shipping Origin Agent
  5. Freight Handler
  6. Consolidation Warehouse
  7. Port
  8. Shipping Line
  9. Container Line
  10. Destination Port
  11. Bonded Warehouse
  12. Shipping Destination Agent
  13. Shipping Broker

1. Going International: The Basics

When moving internationally, there are many things that must be taken into consideration. Most people will only make a move of this magnitude once in their lifetimes. Most of the people that move to another country do not have the slightest clue how to go about it. Moving Authority is here to help guide first-time international movers in their goal of making a successful international move.

There are many different parties involved in cross-country moves. It may help you to understand how your goods get from one place to another, especially if you still have some weariness about moving all of your possessions across an ocean.

2. Shipper

You are the shipper since you are the one sending the goods. By accepting your role as the shipper, you are also accepting that you take legal responsibility for all of the goods that are being exported out of your country and imported to the new country. You should set some extra money aside in the event that something unexpected should arise.

3. Shipping Company

Whichever moving company you choose will play the role of the move manager. This company will make sure the shipment gets where it needs to go. You will sign a very lengthy contract with this company outlining your aforementioned responsibilities to the goods you are shipping. This company will also send you a final bill. This is also the company that will handle any questions you may have about the shipment, as well as any claims that need to be made, or if you just need some updates on your goods. Any other parties that have control of your goods will be subcontracted employees.

4. Shipping Origin Agent

This company will be responsible for doing a visual examination of the shipment before it begins the export process. They will then give you a quote for the cost of the move. This role may also be filled by the company that you chose to ship the items with.

5. Freight Handler

This company will be in charge of the ocean transport of your goods. They will draw up a bill of lading, which is a document that has your information, as well as information that pertains to your shipment. This company will transport your items from your home or other pickup location to the port where they will be shipped out from.

6. Consolidation Warehouse

Depending on the size of your shipment, you may or may not have a shared shipping container. If you do have a shared container, then your goods will be placed in a warehouse until there is another shipment that can be placed in the container. This may seem counterproductive, but it is just another part of the international shipping process that you will never see, but that is necessary.

7. Port

At this point in the process, your goods are sealed and ready to be transported to the new country. You will not see any part of the goods being loaded onto the ship. The most important piece of information you need to get regarding this is whether the port fees are included in the overall price. They almost always are, but it is better to be safe.

8. Shipping Line

The shipping line is the group or company that operates the ship. They will create a seaway bill of lading, which you will never see. Shipping lines are a vital part of the country to country relations, as well as to the economy. Since they are so important, they have a little more freedom than a traditional land shipping company. First off, they are allowed to overbook their ships, and simply delay some shipments until the next available ship. This could mean additional charges for you, the shipper. They also have the right to ‘end voyage” if they feel that the import port is not reachable due to outside circumstances. Furthermore, the ship lines have the right to throw cargo overboard if they feel that the vessel may sink.  Shipping lines can also make changes to schedules if they need to. The shipping line does not claim any responsibility for the loss of cargo during transport. In the end, shipping lines have a lot of high priority items to get from one port to another, and your household goods simply do not take importance over other goods.

9. Container Line

This is the company that manages the containers that your goods are in. This will have little relevance to you.

10. Destination Port

This is where your goods are unloaded once they finally reach the destination country. You will have to pay for destination handling charges, which are sometimes left out of the initial estimate. However, they must be paid. In any circumstance, you must pay these charges. Expect the charges to be somewhere upwards of $1,500, regardless of how large or small your shipment is.

11. Bonded Warehouse

This warehouse will hold your goods until they are cleared to enter the country. Some countries, such as Canada, require you to be at the warehouse when the goods are being inspected by customs officials. In other cases, however, countries may unload all of your goods and inspect them before informing you of their arrival.

12. Shipping Destination Agent

This company will handle your goods once they arrive in the new country. They will oversee customs clearance, port business, and delivery to your new home.

13. Shipping Broker

A shipping broker is just an entity that manages your goods throughout the process of them arriving in the new country. They don’t do anything too important to the moving process, and none of their work is required. Because of this, you can expect to pay a relatively high price for move brokers.

In the end, it is important to be familiar with the process of shipping goods internationally. Knowing what is happening every step of the way can protect you from having to pay big bucks in the event that something should go wrong.

There are currently no comments

Add Comment

required

required (not published)

optional

Did You Know

Question In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

Question A boat trailer is a trailer designed to launch, retrieve, carry and sometimes store boats.

Question In 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

Question "Six Day on the Road" was a trucker hit released in 1963 by country music singer Dave Dudley. Bill Malone is an author as well as a music historian. He notes the song "effectively captured both the boredom and the excitement, as well as the swaggering masculinity that often accompanied long distance trucking."

Question According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

Question Trucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

Question In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

Question The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

Question The United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number. Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern is highly inconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route. More specifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As it is illustrated in this example, they do not always consistently begin with an even number. However, the 'correct' designation is exemplified in Omaha, Nebraska. In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, which is bypassed by Interstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey. Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
 
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Question The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

Question

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.
 

Question

A circumferential route refers to a public transportation system that follows the route in the shape of a circle. Over time a nickname developed in the European Union, calling transportation networks such as these a "ring road". This is no surprise as Europe has several famous "ring roads" such as the Berliner Ring, the Brussels Ring, the Amsterdam Ring, the Boulevard Périphérique around Paris and the Leeds Inner and Outer ring roads. Other countries adopted the term as well which in turn made the name go international. Australia's Melbourne's Western Ring Road and India's Hyderabad's Outer Ring Road both adopted the name. However in Canada, the term is most commonly used, with "orbital" used to a much lesser extent.
 
On the contrary, the United States calls many "ring roads" as belt-lines, beltways, or loops instead. For example, the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. Some ring roads use terminology such as "Inner Loop" and "Outer Loop". This is, of course, for the sake of directional sense, since compass directions cannot be determined around the entire loop.

Question Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

Question Driver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Union in order to for the complex rules to all member states. Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat. Licences first acquired after 1997, the weight was reduced to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.

Question In today's society, there are rules and regulations everywhere you go, the same goes for commercial vehicles. The federal government has strict regulations that must be met, such as how many hours a driver may be on the clock. For example, 11 hours driving /14 hours on-duty followed by 10 hours off, with a max of 70 hours/8 days or 60 hours/7 days. They can also set rules deciding how much rest and sleep time is required, however, these are only a couple of regulations set. Any violations are often subject to harsh penalties. In some cases, there are instruments to track each driver's hours, which are becoming more necessary.

Question Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.

Question The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency that is devoted to transportation in the United States. The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel and issue's USDOT Number filing to new carriers. The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.