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Furniture Disassembly What To Do If Your Items Are Too Large


Disassembly of furniture

  1. Sometimes Items Are Too Large & Need to Be Disassembled
  2. Cost of Furniture Disassembly
  3. Is Professional Assistance Required?
  4. What Can Be Disassembled? 
    • Beds
    • Shelving Units
    • Dresser Units
    • Tables
  5. Reassembly

1. Sometimes Items Are Too Large & Need to Be Disassembled

Some items are very difficult to move. This often applies to larger items that you probably had to put together when they were new. Large items of furniture are among the hardest things to move from one place to another.

  • Furniture is bulky and often too wide to fit through doors
  • Furniture is too heavy to move up and down stairs
  • Some furniture is very fragile and can be damaged easily

When you are getting ready to move, one of the first things that will come to your mind is how you will move the furniture, especially considering these special traits. The only logical way to move furniture from one place to another is to take it apart. Most furniture is not too hard to take apart. However, some companies will offer to disassemble your furniture for an additional charge.

2. Cost of Furniture Disassembly

As is true with many things in the moving industry, the exact price of furniture disassembly will depend on the company that you choose. If you are doing a local move, the cost of furniture disassembly will be added to your hourly rate. Keep in mind that it will take more time if the movers have to disassemble furniture. You should do it yourself if you are on a time schedule during the move.

Long distance or cross country moves follow similar rules. The price of furniture disassembly will be added to the overall cost of your move. However, you will see a definite price for the service at the beginning of the process. Remember that the movers who are taking your furniture off the truck are not the same ones who put it on. Long distance moves mean that your goods are passed from person to person. The crew at your new location may not be able to put the furniture back together.

3. Is Professional Assistance Required?

It is not required that you pay the moving company extra to take apart your furniture. Of course, you will need someone to help you, as well as some special tools or moving equipment. If you can, you should reference the furniture manuals for specific disassembly instructions. Having the manuals will make it easier for you to put everything back together without hassle. Some articles of furniture may still need a professional’s attention to take apart. This is the case for antique furniture, as well as furniture with highly fragile components.

4. What Can Be Disassembled?

If you are going to move an item that you purchased as one piece, it may be hard for you to decide to take it apart. If you choose to leave it in one piece, you run the risk of damaging the item. If you take it apart, you may be unable to put it back together. However, taking it apart makes much more sense if you are trying to save space on the moving van. Even though these consequences lie overhead, some movers go ahead and take apart certain items of furniture anyway.

  • Beds
    • Larger bed frames are very hard to get in and out of a common door frame. Because of this, movers will almost always take them apart before they begin transporting them. Since many beds are just a few pieces stuck together, it is not too hard to get them apart or back together. Sometimes, you don’t even need tools to get them apart, they are just snapped together.
  • Shelving Units
    • Most bookshelves cannot be moved by simply picking them up and transporting them. Their size makes them hard to maneuver.  However, taking them apart can also be very difficult. You run the risk of damaging them if you aren’t careful. Many shelving units are fit together perfectly, which means they will be loosened permanently if you take them apart. These are better left for the moving professionals.
  • Dresser Units
    • Since dressers are very wide and heavy, they are not very easy to move in one piece. Even the smallest units can still weigh a lot because they are often made from real wood. Any loose parts will have to be secured or taken out prior to moving. If the dresser has any glass mirrors attached, they will need to be shrink wrapped before transporting.
  • Tables
    • Since tables are also very wide, they are best taken apart before the move as well. Tables can be essentially made flat if the legs are removed and stored underneath. This makes them much easier to move as opposed to in their assembled state.
    • Among other items that should be disassembled before the move are workout machines, desks, and sectional sofas.

5. Reassembly

Once your items reach the new location, the movers will put them back together in the reverse order of how they took them apart. As is natural for furniture that is taken apart, it may not fit together exactly as it did before. Reassembled pieces may be tighter or looser. This is unavoidable and better than damaging a piece of furniture that should have been disassembled.

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