COMMERCIAL MOVING

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Commercial Moving Guide

Commercial moving is an exciting opportunity for any company to expand floorspace and cultivate their business. Moving Authority understands the importance of maintaining company workflow, keep moving costs effective, and staying on schedule. As a result, Moving Authority has carefully researched and compiled a collection of the best commercial movers the industry has to offer.

office

Our site includes commercial moving companies that offer an in-depth array of services to ensure that your company doesn't experience any loss in workflow during the relocation. Each moving company has been hand-picked for their expertise.

In addition, each service provider on the list boasts highly-rated reviews and is approved by the better business bureau.

Our easy-to-use service locator and dashboard makes moving authority incredibly accessible to any commercial business. Whether you are moving your company across town or across country, moving authority is the most trusted resource for company to moving service pairing.

As a company ourselves, we understand that each workspace relies on the smooth operation of every part- from individual employee function to computer accessibility. Moving Authority provides you with tools to plan your move and companies to facilitate relocation. Everything begins with a small input of information on your side.

Everything begins with a small input of information on your side

The information you will need to know in order to receive an accurate quote and breakdown of services is:

  • schedule for move
  • size and type of company
  • the need for IT moving specialists.

Moving Authority can even help you with special requests like office furnishings and junk removal. The more detailed you are in describing your needs, the easier it will be to connect you with a moving company with an exact match for service.

Business people

Finally, Moving Authority knows the importance of keeping costs down. For this reason, we've selected not only the best moving companies around- but also companies that are willing to be flexible with moving costs. The ideal surrounding commercial moving is the prospect for increased business, so relocating should not hinder profitability by being too costly. Moving Authority will never share your information with service providers who are inexperienced or without a full-time staff. We've learned that the moving is a business in itself, and while independent contractors can offer competitive rates- the resulting service is inconsistent.

Our goal is to help you achieve all your commercial
moving needs, without managing movers


Once you've developed a plan with your moving company, you can proceed to focus on streamlining operations. We can even help determine
a schedule for relocating sensitive IT equipment so it doesn't disturb need to disturb current workflow, or direct you to technicians to help
upgrade information storage to more efficient cloud-based options.



When business is booming, look to Moving Authority to manage your commercial moving.

Comments

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Shannon Kipping

5 years, 5 months ago

If a corporation needs to move to another State and has to connect around 21 computers, should I leave this task to the movers when they deliver in Oregon. We are moving from Texas and the moving company is from Dallas so I'm just a bit worried that they can do it all. Just wondering if you had the answer.

user avatar

Ashley Richmond

5 years, 5 months ago

Great questions Shannon,

You should definitely communicate what you communicated in your comment to the movers. If you need to be operational you need to plan ahead and have an IT team ready to connect you so that you can resume business immediately. You're going to be pulling your hair out if you wait till the last minute to try and find an IT company plus you'll probably pay a pretty penny if you're in a rush to get back to business. An hourly rate for an IT person is around 25 dollars an hour. You're going to need at least 3 people to be able to put up 21 computers and log them in. Make sure you contact the ISP you're going to be using as well. Are you going to be using an in-house server or do you have a cloud solution. I hope I've answered some of your questions and you are more than welcome to contact me via the chat.

Good luck.

Avatar

Trudy Page

5 years, 1 month ago

We are getting new computers in the new premises, would the moving company be able to dispose of any printers and computers we are not taking with us, or would it best to do it ourselves. Also, is there a specific company we can use in New York to get rid of computers and electronic devices?

user avatar

Ashley Richmond

5 years ago

Hi Trudy. I think the best course of action is to find companies that specialize in the disposal of computers and printers, especially if the computers still have important confidential information on them. Many moving and storage companies usually sell the items that take space in their warehouses so you may want to delete all of your information on the hard drives of the computers if you don't want your information accidentally being sold to bidders.

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Free moving boxes are everywhere, you jus have to keep your eyes open and know where to look. Using free boxes is not only a great way to save money, but it also helps save the environment, since you are reusing boxes as opposed to buying entirely new ones.

 

Just because the boxes are free of charge, it does not mean you should take them. You should first make sure that the boxes are sturdy and clean. This is an important thing to check if you want to keep your stuff safe and clean when transporting it to your new destination.

 

Here are the top 6 places to find free moving boxes:

 

  1. Craigslist

 

Craigslist is a great place to find free moving boxes. Look at the Free Stuff section on the site. You have a better chance of finding

 

If you don’t have any luck in this section, try posting an ad in the Wanted section of the site. Most people who want to get rid of their boxes will most likely look here first, to see in anyone else is in need of them.

 

  1. Freecycle

 

You will have to join the local Freecycle group in your area before you can post an ad. Post an ad asking for free boxes and see if you get a response. Most likely, you will. You never know what is just lying around someone’s house.

 

  1. Stores/Retailers

 

Simply ask retailers in your area if they are willing to give away their used boxes. They will probably say yes, and employees there will be more than happy to help you take them to your car, since it reduces the amount that they will have to break down and take to the dumpster later. Also, you can drive behind supermarkets and look for the bin where they throw away boxes they no longer need. Just to be nice, you should check with the store before taking them.

 

  1. Office Buildings

 

Many office buildings have boxes that they are willing to get rid of. They get a lot of packages every day, and after they are unloaded, there is no need for them to hoard the boxes. Just go inside and tell the receptionist what you are looking for. They will most likely point you in the direction of free boxes.

 

  1. Apartment Buildings

 

Apartment buildings are a nice place to look for boxes, due to the fact that people always move in and out apartment complexes. Ask the building manager, who will tell you where the boxes are or who you can get them from.

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. both politically as well as economically since the notion has begun. Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freight was moved by train or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were first exclusively used by the military during World War I.   After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's. Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service. During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System. The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

In 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story is loosely based on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

Medium trucks are larger than light but smaller than heavy trucks. In the US, they are defined as weighing between 13,000 and 33,000 pounds (6,000 and 15,000 kg). For the UK and the EU, the weight is between 3.5 and 7.5 tons (3.9 and 8.3 tons). Local delivery and public service (dump trucks, garbage trucks, and fire-fighting trucks) are around this size.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The FMCSA has established rules to maintain and regulate the safety of the trucking industry. According to FMCSA rules, driving a goods-carrying CMV more than 11 hours or to drive after having been on duty for 14 hours, is illegal. Due to such heavy driving, they need a break to complete other tasks such as loading and unloading cargo, stopping for gas and other required vehicle inspections, as well as non-working duties such as meal and rest breaks. The 3-hour difference between the 11-hour driving limit and 14 hour on-duty limit gives drivers time to take care of such duties. In addition, after completing an 11 to 14 hour on duty period, the driver much be allowed 10 hours off-duty.

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

Words have always had a different meaning or have been used interchangeably with others across all cultures. In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles. Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

With the ending of World War I, several developments were made to enhance trucks. Such an example would be by putting pneumatic tires replaced the previously common full rubber versions. These advancements continued, including electric starters, power brakes, 4, 6, and 8 cylinder engines. Closed cabs and electric lighting followed. The modern semi-trailer truck also debuted. Additionally, touring car builders such as Ford and Renault entered the heavy truck market.