Yerges Van Liners

USDOT # 46561
1230 Whitewater Ave
Fort Atkinson, WI 53538
Fort Atkinson
Wisconsin
Contact Phone: (800) 852-1852
Additional Phone: (920) 563-5000
Company Site: yergesmoving.com

Moving with Yerges Van Liners

Sometimes there is a need to move your items, there is a team you can believe will treat your belongings with great care. whether it be library antiquiteies, pianos, household goods, vehicles or medical equipment, Zerges is your one stop shop.



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Your Yerges Van Liners Reviews

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Avoid this company. They are dishonest. False advertising posted on their trucks and literature. about the company.

Storage at your own risk, leave your camper for other's to enjoy and trash.

Well done from get site in North Dartmouth MA to conveyance in Canoga Park CA. Would us this administration once more

We were greatly satisfied with Yerges Van Lines. Their movers were respectful, pleasing, and supportive, and their rates are extremely sensible.

Did You Know

Question“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

QuestionAll cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety.Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emissionrequirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. Thiswas intendedto protect the public from noise health side effects.The loud noise is due to the way trucks contributedisproportionatelyto roadway noise.This isprimarilydue to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

Question

In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

Question

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit.It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman"in order todeliver bootleg beer.Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyrideentirelydevoid from economic reality"
Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends whojustmight get mad!"

QuestionThe term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry.This is where the wordis knownto havebeen usedin 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage)specificallya large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin.It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911.Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry"was usedfor a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.