Branchland Movers Top Rated

(888) 787-7813

15 Movers in Branchland

Sponsored

LAST REVIEW

8 5 1 Reviewed 8 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Sue Hilliard

Did a great job with my local move with lots of steps up to my new house.

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Emilia D

Jeff was extremely useful noting every one of my inquiries. I didn't wind up utilizing their administrations, not winding up taking everything when I move. Notwithstanding, on the off chance that he took an ideal opportunity to still answer every one of my inquiries in subtle element I could just envision the great occupation they do moving. I've called numerous spots talked with numerous movers he had the best over full administration moving costs, too terrible I needn't bother with the administration any longer. I would prescribe them.

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Fullerton, CA

Additional consideration was tackled our part to safeguard nothing got damaged...something these folks do too. They added to our very own exertion and were exceptionally aware of being cautious yet proficient. Need to say...they were brief and avid to make the move go well. Can represent the two "courteous fellows" that helped us...OLIVER and MAX were Great!

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Catherine L

We work at a senior group and dependably call of Nathan and his gathering! Legitimate, pleasant and dependably puts our inhabitants first. I would very prescribe them to anybody, for any sort of move.

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - CAROL L SCHIPPERS

Hard working-family company. Came out and gave me estimate, then 5 days later moved my belongings from townhouse to a house 30 min away. Quote was exactly right on time needed, and rate was very reasonable. Very happy with the move and would use them again.

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Shannon G.

The estimator was brilliantly proficient and on the ball. I moved before the stuff was grabbed by the movers and they were incredible. Consistent contact thus supportive when they arrived! It was an incredible ordeal to not need to stress so much when I had a 8 day drive myself from WV to CA and needed to discover a house to place stuff in!

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Misty H.

Fantastic!! There were 3 folks and they were astonishing. We were moving from fourth floor (no lift) condo to a house and they were so quick. It just took them a few hours to move my stuff even with every one of the progressions at the loft. Prescribe!

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Steve M.

The folks I had were moderate and I was paying by the hour. Moreover, they harmed a cowhide couch that had taken a toll $2,000. I presented a case with pictures and documentation. Following 4 months and various telephone calls, I at long last got a settlement of $75.00. Extremely amateurish gathering and I would not suggest them by any stretch of the imagination!

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Kristi S.

Try not to utilize this moving Company. The main thing that turned out badly was the proprietor did not have me planned for the right day. Upon the arrival of my turn, I needed to call and ask him where his group was. They were assume to arrive at 9:00 am however did not appear until 11:20 am. The proprietor did not give me a rebate for his misstep. After the move, I found some gems and coins missing. When I reported it to the proprietor, he was not exceptionally supportive. I will never utilize this organization again. In the event that you choose to utilize this organization, be cautious.

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Eddy D.

These folks were extraordinary! Appeared on time and were exceptionally cautious with our effects. They even figured out how to get my creature of a lounge chair out the entryway. Quick and effective, I would suggest their moving services.

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Alexander L.

Wrapped all the furniture and essential things truly well. They lost the heading a tiny bit, yet marked down for that time. Extremely expert, and deferential. I Would prescribe them profoundly to anybody.

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Luis O.

These folks were marvelous! Watts Brothers were quick, productive, and friendly.They appeared on time and called early to tell me when they will be. Genuinely we will never utilize any other individual acknowledge this moving company!

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - William L.

These folks were incredible! Appeared on time and were extremely watchful with our things. They even figured out how to get my beast of a lounge chair out the entryway. Quick and productive, I would prescribe their moving smile.

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Shimeka H.

Evans Van & Storage did a great job with our move. They were very efficient and courteous. Highly recommended if you're looking for movers!

United States West Virginia Branchland

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Lazaro N.

Everything was stuffed and moved with a ton of consideration the entire time. They truly take an ideal opportunity to make a point to do all that you ask. I would prescribe them to anybody!

United States West Virginia Branchland

Finding a mover can be hard without the appropriate resources. However you 're in luck! We can give a simplified compilation of the most services in your region. In order to be most informed, we strongly suggest that you read Moving Authority's reviews of any mover before making final decisions. By reading the Branchland, West Virginia reviews of a relocation company, you are able to use them to your interests. Reviews are highly powerful because they are so informative, but keep in mind that they are someone else's opinion so watch out for bias and try to remain objective.

We strongly recommend researching the service, you are considering, because, once you have become informed, you will be able to make a realistic budget in preparation for the move. Through Moving Authority you can obtain an honest Branchland, West Virginia shipping company that 's low-priced for you and tailored to your specific type of relocation. If you 're looking to relocate to Branchland, West Virginia, you can find Branchland, West Virginia local shipping companies, long distance relocation companies, and even self-service movers. Pick up a free moving estimate to keep on track.

A more detail way of life way of comprehending your moving costs is by using our gratuitous moving cost computer. This gives you a quotation that is accurate and is staggeringly enlightening to those working with a minimum budget. This resourcefulness is rather good, helpful, particularly for those with a tight budget. If you 're resourceful, take the review article, manage your , and design your budget consequently; you will appease organized throughout the on the face of it frantic moving operation of relocating. Watch Moving Authority self confidence to cause finding your Branchland, West Virginia moving service a easy chore.

Do you know?

Do you know quotes

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. both politically as well as economically since the notion has begun. Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freight was moved by train or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were first exclusively used by the military during World War I.   After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's. Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service. During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System. The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

Relocation, or moving, is the process of vacating a fixed location, such as a residence or business, and settling in a different one. A move might be to a nearby location such as in the same neighborhood or a much farther location in a different city or even a different country. Moving usually includes packing up all belongings, transferring them to the new location, and unpacking them. It will also be necessary to update administrative information. This includes tasks such as notifying the post office, changing registration data, change of insurance, services etc. It is important to remember this step in the relocation process. 

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

In 1984 the animated TV series The Transformers told the story of a group of extraterrestrial humanoid robots. However, it just so happens that they disguise themselves as automobiles. Their leader of the Autobots clan, Optimus Prime, is depicted as an awesome semi-truck.

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

In order to load or unload bots and other cargo to and from a trailer, trailer winches are designed for this purpose. They consist of a ratchet mechanism and cable. The handle on the ratchet mechanism is then turned to tighten or loosen the tension on the winch cable. Trailer winches vary, some are manual while others are motorized. Trailer winches are most typically found on the front of the trailer by towing an A-frame.

Some trailers can be towed by an accessible pickup truck or van, which generally need no special permit beyond a regular license. Such examples would be enclosed toy trailers and motorcycle trailers. Specialized trailers like an open-air motorcycle trailer and bicycle trailers are accessible. Some trailers are much more accessible to small automobiles, as are some simple trailers pulled by a drawbar and riding on a single set of axles. Other trailers also have a variety, such as a utility trailer, travel trailers or campers, etc. to allow for varying sizes of tow vehicles.

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.