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Accountable Moving and Storage

4/5

Membership(s) & License

LICENSE INFO:

US DOT None

Accountable Moving and Storage authority

Toll Free

(800) 541-0571

Phone

(206) 763-6060

Website

www.accountablemoving.com

Our Office

206 S Brandon St

Accountable Moving and Storage 206 S Brandon St

Bekins Northwest is situated in different urban areas crosswise over Washington. The expert staff of Bekins Northwest has over 85 years of involvement in the moving business. We persistently endeavor to raise the standard so we can give our clients the most ideal administration in the moving business.

Our profoundly qualified staff of record administrators, movers, packers, and drivers are considered specialists in the business. We keep up specialists in private moving, office moving, frameworks furniture establishments, global crating, uncommon items, and corporate migrations. A hefty portion of Washington's biggest bosses, including the State of Washington, have depended on our mastery and quality administrations. We are glad to be an Agent for Bekins Van Lines, and their "client first" theory.

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Customers Reviews

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June N

June N

02/23/2016

I utilized Accountable Moving for an interstate move from Seattle to LA. I was exceptionally uncertain at first as I'd heard a wide range of stories about moves turned sour. Every one of these reasons for alarm ended up being unwarranted with Accountable. Josh stopped by to do the walk through and give the appraisal. He was truly benevolent and knowledgable. He kept me assessed of every advancement, similar to when my driver was doled out and when I may hope to get my stuff on the flip side. He was responsive, expeditiously noting questions through email, content and telephone. He was extraordinary to work with all through the move and helped me feel certain that all would go well. His quote likewise happened to be the least of the three I got, and I later discovered, when I got the last bill, that his was additionally the most exact evaluation of the heaviness of my stuff. Eddie was the driver appointed to my stuff. He was incredible to work with as well. He was extremely careful with reviewing my stuff and truly proficient amid stacking and emptying. I know the nervousness that accompanies moving, so I can exceptionally suggest Accountable for an anxiety free move.

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did you know

Did you know?

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

There are certain characteristics of a truck that makes it an "off-road truck". They generally standard, extra heavy-duty highway-legal trucks. Although legal, they have off-road features like front driving axle and special tires for applying it to tasks such as logging and construction. The purpose-built off-road vehicles are unconstrained by weighing limits, such as the Libherr T 282B mining truck.

Truckload shipping is the movement of large amounts of cargo. In general, they move amounts necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or inter-modal container. A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is quite the opposite of a Less than Truckload (LTL) freight services. Less than Truckload shipping services generally mix freight from several customers in each trailer. An advantage Full Truckload shipping carriers have over Less than Truckload carrier services is that the freight isn't handled during the trip. Yet, in an LTL shipment, goods will generally be transported on several different trailers.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.