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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mike M.

“This Company, appeared on time and got right to...”

“This Company, appeared on time and got right to business. They were proficient, didn't squander at whatever time ...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Marry T

“My beginning presentation of Bekins Northwest w...”

“My beginning presentation of Bekins Northwest was a beguiling one. Jim offered me some help with getting everything s...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Meghan O

“Lofty surpassed my desires on each level and ma...”

“Lofty surpassed my desires on each level and made moving, my minimum most loved movement, as simple and anxiety free ...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - David smith

“Why would anyone hire these racists immgrants? ...”

“Why would anyone hire these racists immgrants? The owmers hate black folks.”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - John B.

“I've referred to Sidney for some time as he was...”

“I've referred to Sidney for some time as he was one of my customers. In the wake of losing his employment he chose to...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Chris Taylor

“WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T GO WITH PUGET SOUND MOVI...”

“WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T GO WITH PUGET SOUND MOVING!!! Josh Robinson is incompetent, unprofessional, and doesn't car...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Chris B

“In the wake of perusing audits and calling a co...”

“In the wake of perusing audits and calling a couple of various companys, I procured Majestic for a brisk and simple m...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Williams S.

“I utilized the pressing administrations twice a...”

“I utilized the pressing administrations twice as of now. They are quick and great. I will utilize them again on the o...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Abigail D.

“They have moved me twice. They've made an aweso...”

“They have moved me twice. They've made an awesome showing both times. I will utilize them for my best course of action.”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Robert T.

“Bader and Olson Movers are the best ever! Junio...”

“Bader and Olson Movers are the best ever! Junior and his Team shake the moving procedure. Minding, touchy and quick! ...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Henry A.

“Moderate and expert! VASHON TRUCKING cited ...”

“Moderate and expert! VASHON TRUCKING cited us with our financial plan and completed the process of everything ins...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Karen W.

“Most likely the first occasion when I'm content...”

“Most likely the first occasion when I'm content with movers! Respectability Movers made a wonderful showing. Nothing ...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Albert D.

“These folks are great! They (2 folks) bailed me...”

“These folks are great! They (2 folks) bailed me move out of my flat in under 3 hours, something that took my companio...”

United States Washington Redmond

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2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Divine A.

“Movers went to my place on time and all around ...”

“Movers went to my place on time and all around prepared. No imbecilic inquiries, no horse crap. They began at 10 am a...”

United States Washington Redmond

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Andrea R.

“Stunning, never have I had such an incredible m...”

“Stunning, never have I had such an incredible moving background! I was fearing moving and made such an amazing showin...”

United States Washington Redmond

Searching a mover can be difficult without the appropriate resources. However you 're in luck! We can give a simplified compilation of the most shipping companies in your area. In order to be most informed, we powerfully suggest that you read Moving Authority's reviews of any service before making last decisions. With so many options to pick and select from,reading a Redmond, Washington shipping company's reviews can tell a lot, a great deal, more than you would think. We are using someone else's opinion about these moving companies, that's why our reviews are highly powerful and stay objective.

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Redmond is bordered by Kirkland to the west, Bellevue to the southwest, and Sammamish to the southeast. Unincorporated King County lies to the north and east. The city's downtown lies just north of Lake Sammamish ; residential areas lie north and west of the lake. The Sammamish River runs north from the lake along the west edge of the city's downtown.
Redmond is located at 47°40′10″N 122°07′26″W  /  47.669414°N 122.123875°W  / 47.669414; -122.123875 .
According to the United States Census Bureau , the city has a total area of 16.94 square miles (43.87 km 2 ), of which, 16.28 square miles (42.17 km 2 ) is land and 0.66 square miles (1.71 km 2 ) is water.

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Public transportation is vital to a large part of society and is in dire need of work and attention. In 2010, the DOT awarded $742.5 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 11 transit projects. The awardees specifically focused light rail projects. One includes both a commuter rail extension and a subway project in New York City. The public transportation New York City has to offer is in need of some TLC. Another is working on a rapid bus transit system in Springfield, Oregon. The funds also subsidize a heavy rail project in northern Virginia. This finally completes the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's Metro Silver Line, connecting to Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport. This is important because the DOT has previously agreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. both politically as well as economically since the notion has begun. Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freight was moved by train or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were first exclusively used by the military during World War I.   After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's. Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service. During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System. The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

In the United States, shipments larger than about 7,000 kg (15,432 lb) are classified as truckload freight (TL). It is more efficient and affordable for a large shipment to have exclusive use of one larger trailer. This is opposed to having to share space on a smaller Less than Truckload freight carrier.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation. The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States. The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.

In the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items to be moved and the distance it will go. Cost is also based on how quickly the items are to be moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.