Kuhn Moving and Storage

USDOT # 576861
PUC # 576861
44112 Mercure Cir
Sterling, VA 20166-2017
Sterling
Virginia
Contact Phone: (800) 673-8487
Additional Phone: (703) 260-4282
Company Site: www.jkmoving.com

Moving with Kuhn Moving and Storage

Kuhn Moving and Storage is one of the listed moving companies in your field.
Kuhn Moving and Storage can transport your belongings in your country from your former seat to your stigma unexampled space.
Customers have told us Kuhn Moving and Storage is in the domain and our Kuhn Moving and Storage reviews below reflect instructive input.




See More Moving companies in Sterling, Virginia

Your Kuhn Moving and Storage Reviews

required
required (not published)

Our involvement with Kuhn Moving and Storage was extremely positive. They touched base on time and moved everything productively and effectively shielded everything from the pouring precipitation. We would suggest their administrations!

Did You Know

Question

In the moving industry, transportation logistics management isincrediblyimportant.Essentially, it is the management that implements and controls efficiency, the flow of storage of goods, as well as services.This includes related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption to meet customer's specifications.Logistics is quite complex but canbe modeled, analyzed, visualized, and optimized by simulation software.Generally, the goal of transportation logistics management is to reduce or cut the use of such resources.A professional working in the field of moving logistics managementis calleda logistician.

QuestionIn 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI)was establishedas an organization.However, in 1905 the namewas changedto the Office Public Records (OPR).The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names.So, the organization's namewas changedthree more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although itwas abolishedin 1949.Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.

QuestionThe decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed todramaticallyincrease popularity among trucker culture.Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck driversare romanticizedas modern-day cowboys and outlaws.These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Informationregardingthe locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

QuestionUnfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers havebeen portrayedas chauvinists or even worse, serial killers.The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.

QuestionThe American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests.These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement.In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These testsessentiallyled to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress.The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks tobe determined bya bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.