Kuhn Moving and Storage

USDOT # 576861
PUC # 576861
44112 Mercure Cir
Sterling, VA 20166-2017
Sterling
Virginia
Contact Phone: (800) 673-8487
Additional Phone: (703) 260-4282
Company Site: www.jkmoving.com

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Our involvement with Kuhn Moving and Storage was extremely positive. They touched base on time and moved everything productively and effectively shielded everything from the pouring precipitation. We would suggest their administrations!

Did You Know

QuestionAs we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo.Trailers may alsobe usedin a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

Question

Full truckload carriersnormallydeliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination.Once the traileris filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork.Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way.Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance.It istypicallyaccepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.

QuestionThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations.At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States.Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and workingis limited.The FMCSA regulates theminimumamount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

QuestionBy the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight.When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers arelargelyunfamiliar with large trucks.As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler'snumerousblind spots.The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.