J.A.R. Freight Forwarding

2768 Towerview Rd
Herndon, VA 20171-3204
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Additional Phone: (703) 471-5704
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Moving with J.A.R. Freight Forwarding

J.A.R. Freight Forwarding contributes certain services to our client as we attempt to meet our customers demands.
Our moving and storage company can transport assets in your area from your previous home to your unexampled residency. Have as well disclosed to us that J.A.R. Freight Forwarding is the practiced in the district.
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The best part about the moving crew is that they were not only on time, but actually early. I had considered this an enigma prior to that happening. An elusive "chupacabra," if you will. Either way, none of our stuff was damaged, it was fast, efficient, and pretty seamless. I can't praise them enough. Thanks for taking care of us and ours, guys!

Did You Know

QuestionThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation.The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States.The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

QuestionDOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS canbe forcedto stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, maynegativelyaffect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveysindicatedriversroutinelyget away with violating the HOS.Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers shouldbe requiredto us EOBRs in their vehicles.Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.


The FMCSA has established rules to maintain and regulate the safety of the trucking industry.According to FMCSA rules, driving a goods-carrying CMV more than 11 hours or to drive after having been on duty for 14 hours, is illegal.Due to such heavy driving, they need a break to complete other tasks such as loading and unloading cargo, stopping for gas and other required vehicle inspections, as well as non-working duties such as meal and rest breaks.The 3-hour difference between the 11-hour driving limit and 14 hour on-duty limit gives drivers time to take care of such duties.In addition, after completing an 11 to 14 hour on duty period, the driver muchbe allowed10 hours off-duty.


The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.

QuestionCommercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you.Justto name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes.They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways.They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.