Alpha Moving-N-Storage

USDOT # 2196060
264 West 33rd Street
Ogden, UT 84401
Ogden
Utah
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (801) 621-4899
Company Site: www.alphamovingnstorage.com

Moving with Alpha Moving-N-Storage

Our attention to service and quality has made us an industry leader in Ogden, Utah and throughout the United States. Our customers always comes first and we constantly strive to exceed expectations. With our wide range of transportation, relocation, and storage services, you're sure to find a precise solution to your relocation needs. We proudly serve Ogden, Northern Utah and surrounding areas, and locations throughout the country. We have some of the best movers in Utah!
We are a full-service moving and storage company based in Ogden, Utah. We proudly specialize in serving military and defense personnel with local and international relocation services. We also serve the local household and commercial markets—if you need a home or office moved locally or long distance we’d love to help you out! With a dedicated staff of some of the most professional and courteous relocation specialists in the industry, we can accommodate any of your moving needs with the best customer service in the industry.



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Your Alpha Moving-N-Storage Reviews

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Alpha moving was excellent!!! They moved and wrapped everything in an auspicious way, and had extraordinary costs. I will def use them for my best course of action!

Did You Know

QuestionIn 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

QuestionDOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS canbe forcedto stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, maynegativelyaffect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveysindicatedriversroutinelyget away with violating the HOS.Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers shouldbe requiredto us EOBRs in their vehicles.Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

QuestionThe FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book.This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred.In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). Thisautomaticallyrecords the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

QuestionBy the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight.When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers arelargelyunfamiliar with large trucks.As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler'snumerousblind spots.The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

QuestionHeavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).