Coleman American Moving Services

USDOT # 76235
5819 Lexington Dr
El Paso, TX 79924
El Paso
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (915) 771-8330
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Moving with Coleman American Moving Services

We have been focused on making moving simpler and more secure for families since 1914. Whenever J.M. Coleman established the organization with eight steeds, a couple of wagons and an enduring devotion to administration, he had a fantasy for what's to come. Presently with more than 100 years of experience under our wheels, Coleman Worldwide Moving stays valid in its unique center - you, the client. Albeit numerous things have changed since that first move, we comprehend that an individual's fundamental requirements for trust, appreciation and trustworthiness have not. Whether your fantasies incorporate moving over the road, crosswise over America or crosswise over landmasses, you can trust Coleman-Allied to go "that additional mile" when you require it.From transporting a solitary family unit to huge corporate and government exchanges, Coleman-Allied is prepared to handle your necessities. Our profoundly created system incorporates moving organization areas all through the United States and enter Allied office affiliations in different markets all through the world. Driven by a long-held duty to client benefit and upheld by an elevated expectation of fabulousness, Coleman-Allied stays concentrated on you and your crew. As you start this new adventure, let Coleman-Allied lead the way. Together, we can take your fantasies to new statures!

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Your Coleman American Moving Services Reviews

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They were extremely respectful and watchful with all our stuff. Additionally exceptionally astute as to where things went and monitoring everything. Notwithstanding when a little screw bit of our furniture broke they immediately looked for a substitution piece at Home Depot to ensure it could be altered rapidly. Also the folks were exceptionally obliging and aware of our home. I would most certainly prescribe them to anybody requiring a decent mover.

Did You Know

QuestionThe decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

QuestionThe year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck".While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as faras tosay "motor-powered load carrier".

QuestionA semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle.Proportionally, its weightis supported bytwo factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-traileris equippedwith legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it canbe loweredto support it when itis uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways.However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

QuestionTracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary.Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greektrokhos(τροχός), meaning "wheel", fromtrekhein(τρέχειν, "to run").

QuestionHeavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).