Come and Take It Moving

USDOT # 2934814
1508 Lunday Rd
Cedar Park, TX 78613
Cedar Park
Texas
Contact Phone: 512-337-5242
Additional Phone: (512) 337-5242
Company Site: comeandtakeitmoving.com

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Did You Know

QuestionIn some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

QuestionThe FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book.This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred.In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). Thisautomaticallyrecords the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

QuestionWith the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media.Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving.He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry.It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamiltoncertainlytakes an interesting perspectivehistoricallyspeaking.

QuestionCommercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you.Justto name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes.They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways.They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.