Volunteer Moving & Storage

USDOT None
1812 Prosser Rd
Knoxville, TN 37914
Knoxville
Tennessee
Contact Phone: (865) 862-0757
Additional Phone: (865) 862-0757
Company Site: www.armstrongrelocation.com

Moving with Volunteer Moving & Storage

We will pursue our vision as we carry our mission to provide the highest value to our customers and stakeholders by building an organization of passionate team members working together to deliver excellence in quality, safety and customer satisfaction. We build trust, reduce stress and deliver reliability, around the world. We do so by acting in accordance with our foundational DNA principles:

  • Unity: We are stronger together
  • Integrity: We do the right thing
  • Attitude: We are positively passionate
  • Value: Customers define it; we deliver it
  • Relationships: We value them above all
  • Communication: We listen, learn and respond
  • Generosity: We succeed and share



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Your Volunteer Moving & Storage Reviews

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Never again. Scammers and thiefs.

My spouse is in the armed force, and this moving company was contracted to move us. We treated our packers extremely well: we purchased them what they asked for lunch and approached them with deference. At that point we had about $1000 in things stolen from one packer specifically. A few of our things stolen were of high money related quality, while two or three our things were of nostalgic worth that can NEVER be supplanted. Stay away from this moving company that brags they just contract individuals with respectability; we were tricked.

Did You Know

QuestionThe public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations.However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time.The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's theywere depictedas heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road.Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as theywere glorifiedas modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's.Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

Question"Six Day on the Road" was a trucker hit released in 1963 by country music singer Dave Dudley. Bill Malone is an author as well as a music historian.He notes the song "effectivelycaptured both the boredom and the excitement, as well as the swaggering masculinity that often accompanied long distance trucking."

QuestionWith the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media.Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving.He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry.It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamiltoncertainlytakes an interesting perspectivehistoricallyspeaking.

QuestionSome trailers canbe towed byan accessible pickup truck or van, which generally need no special permit beyond a regular license. Such examples wouldbe enclosedtoy trailers and motorcycle trailers. Specialized trailers like an open-air motorcycle trailer and bicycle trailers are accessible.Some trailers are much more accessible to small automobiles, as are some simple trailers pulled by a drawbar and riding on a single set of axles.Other trailers also have a variety, such as a utility trailer, travel trailers or campers, etc. to allow for varying sizes of tow vehicles.

QuestionIn today's popular culture, recreational vehicles struggle to find their own niche.Travel trailers or mobile home with limited living facilities, or where people can camp or stay havebeen referredto as trailers.Previously, many would refer to such vehicles as towable trailers.