Carey Moving & Storage Of Knoxville

USDOT # 1701097
4013 Henderson Rd
Knoxville, TN 37921
Knoxville
Tennessee
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (865) 862-4129
Company Site: www.careymoving.com

Moving with Carey Moving & Storage Of Knoxville

Carey Moving & Storage was founded in South Carolina in 1907, with corporate offices established in Spartanburg. Shortly after, we began expanding in the Greenville, SC area, offering full service moving and storage. Our company was one of the founding members of Allied Van Lines in 1928, which began the process of expanding our moving services to cover the eastern coast of the United States. In the following years, our full service moving company expanded its hauling fleet and operations to encompass service up and down the entire East Coast, while also expanding its service offerings to include packing, crating, hauling, and storage. We now have over 1100 agents in the United States and Canada, and 300 international agents, positioning Carey as one of the most trusted national movers. In addition to agents dedicated to residential moves, Carey also employs over 175 agents dedicated to corporate and private transfer clients.




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Your Carey Moving & Storage Of Knoxville Reviews

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We moved from another state to Knoxville. Our neighborhood Allied Agent picked Carey Moving and Storage to move us. Since there are such a large number of positive surveys for this moving company and my experience was not positive, Despite the fact that the issues were distinctive, the moving knowledge portrayed there sounds significantly more like the experience I had than the gleaming audits.

These people moved me and my family from Knoxville, TN to Newport News, VA.
We were on a tight course of events and they came through without a hitch.
From pressing the greater part of our things to stacking, voyaging and offloading, the groups couldn't have been something more. They were depleted however did awesome work!!!
In the event that you have to move....these people are your best choice!

Did You Know

QuestionIn many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

QuestionA business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

QuestionIn some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Question

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit.It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman"in order todeliver bootleg beer.Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyrideentirelydevoid from economic reality"
Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends whojustmight get mad!"

QuestionWith the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media.Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving.He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry.It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamiltoncertainlytakes an interesting perspectivehistoricallyspeaking.