Still Transfer Company

632 Boone St
Kingsport, TN 37660
Contact Phone: (800) 346-6837
Additional Phone: (423) 245-4000
Company Site:

Moving with Still Transfer Company

Still Transfer Company, Inc. has served the local and long distance moving and storage needs of its customers since 1928. We handle both local and long distance moves of households both large and small. Still Transfer’s main service area for origin or destination is Eastern Tennessee and Southwestern Virginia. Shipments which pass through E. TN and SW VA and larger shipments in the eastern US are also a good fit for our operation. Still Transfer specializes in the local, long distance and international shipment of household goods and office equipment.

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Your Still Transfer Company Reviews

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From the move coordinator to the actual packers and delivery men, everyone was very helpful and courteous. Moving is never fun, but they tried to make it as painless as possible. The guys did a good job of getting things to the places I designated and were patient with me as I was juggling a few things at a time while they were here.

We hired Still Transfer to load a POD for the first part of our cross town move. The crew of three - including Lamar & Persian were absolutely phenomenal. Friendly, punctual and extremely hard-working and very capable in their container management skills - so impressive that everything fit!!

I would highly recommend them and we'll be using them again this week for the unload...

Did You Know

QuestionAnother film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband.While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

QuestionThe Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program.This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network.The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions.The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands.They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

QuestionIn 1986 Stephen King released horror film "MaximumOverdrive", a campy kind of story.It isreallyabout trucks that become animated due to radiation emanating from a passing comet.Oddlyenough, the trucks force humans to pump their diesel fuel. Their leaderis portrayedas resembling Spider-Man's antagonist Green Goblin.

QuestionThe 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name.Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground andwas shockedwhen his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute.The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

QuestionThe American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests.These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement.In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These testsessentiallyled to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress.The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks tobe determined bya bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.