The YGS Group

USDOT # 999793
3650 W Market St
York, PA 17404
York
Pennsylvania
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I never contemplated a moving company, yet YGS Group is astonishing. We utilized them to move from Hells Kitchen to the Upper West Side in May. Proficient from beginning to end. Less costly than the quotes we got from two other moving companys and worth each penny. On-time, fast, uncommonly watchful, obliging and truly no deviation from the first cost cited. I will never utilize another moving company again.

Did You Know

QuestionWith the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce wasdrasticallyde-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower payoverall.Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out.However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs.In 1982 the Surface TransportationAssistanceAct established a federalminimumtruck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country.This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

QuestionThe United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry.It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike.However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department.The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation.In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion.He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportationbe elevatedto a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAAbe foldedor merged, if you will, into the DOT.Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideasregardingtransportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

QuestionThe Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federalmaximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg).It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federalminimumweight limit.By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled.Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds.Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

QuestionLight trucksare classifiedthis way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). Theseare used bynot only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) andare authorizedto drive with a driving license for cars.Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa.Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.