John E. George, Inc

USDOT None
121 Tri County DrBldg 6
Freedom, PA 15042
Freedom
Pennsylvania
Contact Phone: (800) 810-2635
Additional Phone: (724) 371-3100
Company Site: www.georgemoving.com

Moving with John E. George, Inc

John E. George, Inc will issue help to our customers as we endeavor to fill our clients motives.
John E. George, Inc can ship your property in your new residence from your onetime office to your mark unexampled spot.
customers have besides disclosed to us that John E. George, Inc is the most unspoiled in this territory. Understand our John E. George, Inc reviews below for check.




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They were perfect and expert when they arrived, and they treated my things with consideration, trying to cushion the sides of my vintage work area and secured my glass foot stool with supports. I was excited that none of my things broke moving. The exchange was additionally super simple, and the value they cited me was what they charged. Super upbeat and would prescribe!

Did You Know

QuestionThe public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations.However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time.The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's theywere depictedas heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road.Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as theywere glorifiedas modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's.Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

QuestionThe Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency thatis devotedto transportation in the United States.The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel.The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Question

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains hadbeen reliedon to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state.The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease.Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move.Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country.The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods.Whether the freightwas manufacturedor produced for the different areasinternationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.

QuestionThe Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).