Peoples Warehouse, Inc.

USDOT # 26826
1425 S 6th St
Klamath Falls, OR 97601
Klamath Falls
Contact Phone: (800) 730-7428
Additional Phone: (800) 730-7428
Company Site:

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By providing services service of process to Peoples Warehouse, Inc. supplies sure serving to our client as we attempt to fulfil all of our customers needs . To our clients, we need to conciliate the demand of our client home.
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Exceptionally expert and cordial. So obliging, they truly see great client administration. No objections at all and will use next time, despite the fact that I trust I never need to move again!

Did You Know

QuestionIn 1976, the number one hit on the Billboard chart was "Convoy," a novelty song by C.W. McCall about a convoy of truck drivers evading speed traps and toll booths across America. The song inspired the 1978 action film Convoy directed by Sam Peckinpah. After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike and participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis (although similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis).

QuestionThe American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association triednumerousmoves.One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

QuestionAMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority.Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check,be licensed bythe FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers.Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions.This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB).As one can imagine, those that passare authorizedto display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials.However, those that fail willbe expelledfrom the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

QuestionThe 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name.Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground andwas shockedwhen his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute.The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

QuestionThe decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed todramaticallyincrease popularity among trucker culture.Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck driversare romanticizedas modern-day cowboys and outlaws.These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Informationregardingthe locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.