American Moving and Storage of Ohio

USDOT # 1264283
470 Schrock Rd Ste C
Columbus, OH 43229
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Additional Phone: (614) 436-8080
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Did You Know

QuestionA semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle.Proportionally, its weightis supported bytwo factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-traileris equippedwith legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it canbe loweredto support it when itis uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways.However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

QuestionWithin the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial.This ismostlydue to the fact that theyrequirethe building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before.This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those whoare opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land.In addition, the cities thatare bypassedmay also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.


In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).


Although there are exceptions, city routes areinterestinglymost often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though theyessentiallyserve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

QuestionBusiness routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town.Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates weretypicallybuilt in particular phases.Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town.The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began.As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".