Ohio Bulk Transfer Company

3203 Harvard Ave
Cleveland, OH 44105
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (216) 883-7200
Company Site:

Moving with Ohio Bulk Transfer Company

See More Moving companies in Cleveland, Ohio

Your Ohio Bulk Transfer Company Reviews

required (not published)

There are currently no reviews

Did You Know

QuestionThe Federal Bridge Law handles relations between the gross weight of the truck, the number of axles, and the spacing between them. This is how they determine is the truck can be on the Interstate Highway system. Each state gets to decide themaximum, under the Federal Bridge Law. They determine by vehicle in combination with axle weight on state and local roads

QuestionA moving scam is a scam by a moving company in which the company provides an estimate, loads the goods, then states a much higher price to deliver the goods, effectively holding the goods as lien but does this without do a change of order or revised estimate.

QuestionIn some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.


The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit.It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman"in order todeliver bootleg beer.Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyrideentirelydevoid from economic reality"
Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends whojustmight get mad!"

QuestionTracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary.Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greektrokhos(τροχός), meaning "wheel", fromtrekhein(τρέχειν, "to run").