Erwin Movers Top Rated

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18 Movers in Erwin

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7 5 1 Reviewed 7 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Unknown

“Trash company”

“Trash company”

United States North Carolina Erwin

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6 5 1 Reviewed 6 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Carrie Partello

“The process of finding a good mover can seem da...”

“The process of finding a good mover can seem daunting. But doing a little research is worth it. 1. Get recom...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

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5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Randy AND Sarah Whitman

“so back weeks ago we scheduled our move through...”

“so back weeks ago we scheduled our move through several companies. so with the covid issues and the kids and work we...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

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3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - toni

“Do not use this company! The women in the off...”

“Do not use this company! The women in the office were very nice but the owner is unhinged. Two of the three men w...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

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3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Gemma Gates

“I got a quote from them for an out of state mov...”

“I got a quote from them for an out of state move and was not awed. The agreement that they sent me over email contain...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sarah D.

“This moving company was awesome. I got cites fr...”

“This moving company was awesome. I got cites from a few moving company , and this was the most reasonable by a long s...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Iamthecarnivore

“Exceed expectations made an extraordinary showi...”

“Exceed expectations made an extraordinary showing pressing and moving our things. Josh was awesome and dropped by and...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jackie B.

“This moving company doesn't merit any stars. Th...”

“This moving company doesn't merit any stars. They grabbed our things and expelled them from the property then returne...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

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3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Brad D.

“My company American Custom Lifts hired Goldsbor...”

“My company American Custom Lifts hired Goldsboro Van & Storage Inc to move our office. The owner Brian had previously...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kristine K.

“Trick, trick, trick. I simply needed to call th...”

“Trick, trick, trick. I simply needed to call the cops to get them off my property. They gave me a quote of $1900, the...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sherif A.

“I called to get a quote and inquired as to whet...”

“I called to get a quote and inquired as to whether movers were accessible to give furniture to the Salvation Army. Th...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Romare H.

“These folks came here and made an astonishing s...”

“These folks came here and made an astonishing showing. I had a flooding issue and the two folks came and moved furnit...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jewelyn Fregoe

“I wish I had gotten the guys to write down thei...”

“I wish I had gotten the guys to write down their names so I could give them each a shout out, but they did an incredi...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - BA S

“Fayetteville Moving and Storage (FMS starting n...”

“Fayetteville Moving and Storage (FMS starting now and into the foreseeable future) were the most noticeably bad packe...”

United States North Carolina Erwin

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United States North Carolina Erwin

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Erwin is located at 35°19′22″N 78°40′19″W  /  35.32278°N 78.67194°W  / 35.32278; -78.67194 (35.322840, −78.672005).
According to the United States Census Bureau , the town has a total area of 4.1 square miles (11 km 2 ), of which, 4.0 square miles (10 km 2 ) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km 2 ) of it (0.99%) is water.

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"Six Day on the Road" was a trucker hit released in 1963 by country music singer Dave Dudley. Bill Malone is an author as well as a music historian. He notes the song "effectively captured both the boredom and the excitement, as well as the swaggering masculinity that often accompanied long distance trucking."

A commercial driver's license (CDL) is a driver's license required to operate large or heavy vehicles.

As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

In 1976, the number one hit on the Billboard chart was "Convoy," a novelty song by C.W. McCall about a convoy of truck drivers evading speed traps and toll booths across America. The song inspired the 1978 action film Convoy directed by Sam Peckinpah. After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike and participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis (although similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis).

“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

Trucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) is an influential association as an advocate for transportation. Setting important standards, they are responsible for publishing specifications, test protocols, and guidelines. All which are used in highway design and construction throughout the United States. Despite its name, the association represents more than solely highways. Alongside highways, they focus on air, rail, water, and public transportation as well.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

In 1986 Stephen King released horror film "Maximum Overdrive", a campy kind of story. It is really about trucks that become animated due to radiation emanating from a passing comet. Oddly enough, the trucks force humans to pump their diesel fuel. Their leader is portrayed as resembling Spider-Man's antagonist Green Goblin.

The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

Unfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers have been portrayed as chauvinists or even worse, serial killers. The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.

1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.