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Why Durham?

Durham, North Carolina, is one of the fastest-growing economical hubs in the United States. Together with the city of Chapel Hill and the state capital of Raleigh, the three distinct areas make up The Research Triangle of North Carolina. This area of technological and educational growth is commonly referred to as "The Triangle," and is home to several major corporations, such as American Airlines, General Electric, Toyota, and Verizon. This region is characterized by its commitment to education, and is home to several insitutions of higher education,including University of North Carolina at Chapel HIll, and the presitigous Duke University.

What The Triangle region boasts even more than its economic and educational advancement is the flawless preservation of Americana in its most pure form. The way of life in Durham, North Carolina is still slow and intentional, despite its fast-moving growth as a city on the national stage. The people in this city are as sweet as the tea they'll serve you as they display their famous Southern Hospitality.

Whether you're on the verge of a career change in The Triangle, you want to begin a new chapter in life, or any other reason for relocating to Durham, let Moving Authority take away some of the confusion. Moving is difficult, and we're here to help. For the most incredible Durham movers, we've got you covered. In addition to our list of the highest-quality movers in Durham NC, check out our moving tips, checklists, and comprehensive guides to make your move a successful one.

What's stopping you?Grab your free moving quote from Moving Authority today.

Did You Know

QuestionThe decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

QuestionThe public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations.However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time.The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's theywere depictedas heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road.Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as theywere glorifiedas modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's.Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

QuestionSignage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

QuestionThroughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route mostcommonlyused on an alternative routing of a highway around a town.Specificallywhen the main route of the highway goes through the town.Originally, these routeswere designatedas "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns.However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass".Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

QuestionThe American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests.These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement.In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These testsessentiallyled to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress.The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks tobe determined bya bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

QuestionWith the ending of World War I, several developmentswere madeto enhance trucks.Such an example would be by putting pneumatic tires replaced thepreviouslycommon full rubber versions.These advancements continued, including electric starters, power brakes, 4, 6, and 8 cylinder engines. Closed cabs and electric lighting followed. The modern semi-trailer truck also debuted.Additionally, touring car builders such as Ford and Renault entered the heavy truck market.