Public Moving Services

USDOT # 2955650
7706 Waterford Square DR Unit 1221
Charlotte, NC 28226
North Carolina
Contact Phone: (844) 563-9255
Additional Phone: (754) 218-7885
Company Site:

Moving with Public Moving Services

By providing peculiar serving to Public Moving Services supplying sure servicing to our clients as we attempt to live up to all of our clients wants . To our clients, we attempt to conciliate the motive of our client home.
Each client has dissimilar demand for their relocation, which is why Public Moving Services provides service and movers to practice our advantageously to conciliate them.
Therefore, take a advantage of the reviews by following up below, whether you're simply reading Public Moving Services reviews or writing them.

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I was moving a huge glass and very heavy dining table as I was moving my buffet restaurant. So, I started searching on the internet and different moving companies were responding. But they responded to my request very quickly. They were just really easy to work with. They gave me a good rate.

Public Moving was outstanding. They were asked to help my family and I move on, quite possibly, the hottest day of the year so far (90s). They maintained their professionalism and positive attitude throughout, and gave us great confidence that everything would be handled well.

I did a move and They helped me arrange the process start to finish, starting with an inhome estimate. It was very close to two other inhome estimates and the rate was competitive for sure. On moving day, the guys rocked the show despite severl storms.

Our moving team was amazing! They were on time, fast, efficient and polite. A great value and a great experience. This was the second time we used Public Moving. We would definitely use them again and highly recommend them to anyone needing a moving company.

for the first time in my experience with movers, I am doing this; recommending a company. The thought of recommending movers had not crossed my mind but my experience with Public Moving Service left me with so much to think about

The guys worked their socks off we had a tricky move as the moving truck was to big to fit down our road so they had to load it on to a small van then load onto the truck what was parked near by. we can highly recommend this company one of the best moves we had and we have moved enough times :).

They truly treated our move as though it was their own. I cannot believe how hard they worked ALL DAY and were running up the ramp at the end of an extremely long day filled with moving very heavy pieces.

All organised at very short notice but all went very smoothly. They were great; they made the day very easy by being fast and efficient and even helped out with objects I was struggling to pack as well as positioning furniture

All organised at very short notice but all went very smoothly. They were great; they made the day very easy by being fast and efficient and even helped out with objects I was struggling to pack as well as positioning furniture

They arrived exactly on time and loaded my goods with care and made sure that everything is protected. I was really impressed while they were caring all those heavy items and kept smiling. Words can not describe their level of professionalism

Did You Know


In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

QuestionUnfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers havebeen portrayedas chauvinists or even worse, serial killers.The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.


The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.

QuestionThe term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry.This is where the wordis knownto havebeen usedin 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage)specificallya large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin.It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911.Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry"was usedfor a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

QuestionHeavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).