Antiques Abroad, Ltd

USDOT # 1001599
PUC # 2361
728 Queens Road
Charlotte, NC 28207
Charlotte
North Carolina
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (704) 332-5577
Company Site: www.antiqueslimited.com

Moving with Antiques Abroad, Ltd

Antiques Abroad, Ltd. is the first American company to take discerning collectors and dealers to non-English, European countries for direct antique buying. After twenty-five years in the shipping business and over a decade in antique-buying trips, we have the experience to give you the best in shopping, negotiating, sourcing and shipping.



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Your Antiques Abroad, Ltd Reviews

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Expensive and dishonesty agreement they will give you papers that doesn't include in the estimated price. weird company. Unprofessional movers and first experience.

These folks did great. They appeared with a grin, and completed work.

Another of my antique problem areas on the bay coast. First time I went to this store I found the one rack stockpiling thing i'd been questing for, from that minute on I was marginally infatuated.

Did You Know

QuestionTrucks and cars have much in commonmechanicallyas well asancestrally.One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were notreallycommon until the mid 1800's. While looking at thispractically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This ismostlydue to the fact that the roads of the timewere builtfor horse and carriages. Steam truckswere leftto very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station.In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton.Steam-powered truckswere soldin France and in the United States,apparentlyuntil the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, theywere knownas 'steam wagons'.

QuestionWithout strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass.This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets.On the contrary, a bypassis intendedto avoid such local street congestion.Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them.Theyare builtin hopes of easing accessibility, while home areideallyavoided for noise reasons.

QuestionAs of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)was establishedas its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999".The FMCSAis basedin Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia.Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

QuestionThe FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book.This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred.In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). Thisautomaticallyrecords the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

QuestionThe 1950's were quite different than the years to come.They were more likely tobe considered"Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers.In these times truck driverswere enviedandwere viewedas an opposition to the book "The Organization Man".Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day.He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers".Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Driversroutinelysabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.