Waterville Movers Top Rated

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15 Movers in Waterville

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LAST REVIEW

177 5 1 Reviewed 177 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - David Coward

“The team was efficient, professional and caring...”

“The team was efficient, professional and caring. In all our possessions there was only one item that suffered a sizab...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - John H

“I'm happy with Mambo Movers. They were easy to ...”

“I'm happy with Mambo Movers. They were easy to coordinate with, arrived on time, knew their stuff about packing and b...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Melissa S

“Simply needed to thank you for pleasing us with...”

“Simply needed to thank you for pleasing us with our turn. We were content with the way things went and the folks were...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Don B

“I was extremely pleased with the service from C...”

“I was extremely pleased with the service from Clinton Moving. From a practical standpoint the movers were very profes...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Tiffany

“Our actual move went well but we had some damag...”

“Our actual move went well but we had some damage to some of our property that I have been trying to get resolved for ...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Grant S

“You are paying by the hour and they are very sl...”

“You are paying by the hour and they are very slow. My grandmother or 6 year old could have moved things faster and ca...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Adrian S

“The worst storage facility. They lost and damag...”

“The worst storage facility. They lost and damaged my furniture and did not take responsibility. They don't return cal...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Wallace W Carey

“A Budd Moving and Storage truck in Beaverton, O...”

“A Budd Moving and Storage truck in Beaverton, Oregon at 11:15 Am on April 26,2021 going East on US 26 and then South ...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Frances Clifford

“Highly recommending this company and its moving...”

“Highly recommending this company and its moving crew to people who want a professional and stress free move. Professi...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ron F

“Excellent service across the board.”

“Excellent service across the board.”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Brian P

“THE ABSOLUTE WORST EXPERIENCE I HAVE EVER HAD W...”

“THE ABSOLUTE WORST EXPERIENCE I HAVE EVER HAD WITH ANY COMPANY, EVER!!!”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Lily M

“Excellent moving company. They helped pack up ...”

“Excellent moving company. They helped pack up and moved our whole house out of state. They were very accommodating ...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Robert F

“I used them to move my grandmother items after ...”

“I used them to move my grandmother items after she passed. It was a min job with 4 flights of stairs but they got it ...”

United States New York Waterville

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Dilan O.

“Genuine experts. Our turn included a converge o...”

“Genuine experts. Our turn included a converge of two homes into one, and they pulled it all off in a matter of hours....”

United States New York Waterville

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United States New York Waterville

Moving Authority can assist you to discover easiest way to select your mover. In order to be informed, we strongly suggest that you read Moving Authority's reviews of any service before making final conclusions. With so many options to pick and select from,reading a Waterville, New York service's reviews can tell a lot, a great deal, more than you would think. We consider these reviews vital sources of information, although at times they may be too private.

So you've done your research correctly? Right away, it's time to create a budgeted plan before you start packing and moving. Through Moving Authority you can find an effective Waterville, New York relocation company that 's affordable for you and tailored to your specific type of move. Moving Authority has extensive listings of the nearby services so you can browse Waterville, New York relocation companies, whether you 're moving locally or cross country. It is all important to obtain a free moving estimate with Moving Authority, this way you can make any necessary adjustments to your budgeted guideline and you will have a clear understanding of the price for your Waterville, New York move.

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Waterville is located at 42°55′54″N 75°22′36″W  /  42.93167°N 75.37667°W  / 42.93167; -75.37667 (42.931591, -75.376538).
The Village of Waterville is on the border of the Town of Marshall and the Town of Sangerfield - two subdivisions of Oneida County, New York .
New York State Route 12 runs north-south through the center of town, where it intersects New York State Route 315 . One mile south of the village, U.S. Route 20 runs east-west and intersects Route 12 in Sangerfield, New York .
According to the United States Census Bureau , the village has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.4 km 2 ), all of it land except the Waterville Creek, a tributary to the Mohawk River that runs through the center of town paralleling Sanger Avenue (Route 12) and Buell Avenue (Route 315). Rolling hills, farmland, and deciduous forests are found in the surrounding area. Other nearby bodies of water include Chittening Pond and the Nine Mile Swamp.
The nearest city, Utica, New York , lies approximately fifteen miles north of the village. At 1,200 feet MSL, the village is at a higher elevation than Utica, which is located in the Mohawk River Valley. By Route 20, Waterville is approximately sixty miles east of Syracuse, NY and eighty miles west of Albany, NY .

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1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

Trucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

Medium trucks are larger than light but smaller than heavy trucks. In the US, they are defined as weighing between 13,000 and 33,000 pounds (6,000 and 15,000 kg). For the UK and the EU, the weight is between 3.5 and 7.5 tons (3.9 and 8.3 tons). Local delivery and public service (dump trucks, garbage trucks, and fire-fighting trucks) are around this size.

The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

There are many different types of trailers that are designed to haul livestock, such as cattle or horses. Most commonly used are the stock trailer, which is enclosed on the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animals in order to allow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horses are hauled with the purpose of attending or participating in competition. Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailers are designed for the comfort and safety of the animals. They're typically well-ventilated with windows and vents along with specifically designed suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit. There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

Smoke and the Bandit was released in 1977, becoming the third-highest grossing movie. Following only behind Star Wars Episode IV and Close Encounter of the Third Kind, all three movies making an impact on popular culture. Conveniently, during that same year, CB Bears debuted as well. The Saturday morning cartoon features mystery-solving bears who communicate by CB radio. As the 1970's decade began to end and the 80's broke through, the trucking phenomenon had wade. With the rise of cellular phone technology, the CB radio was no longer popular with passenger vehicles, but, truck drivers still use it today.

Ultra light trucks are very easy to spot or acknowledge if you are paying attention. They are often produced variously such as golf cars, for instance, it has internal combustion or a battery electric drive. They usually for off-highway use on estates, golf courses, parks, in stores, or even someone in an electric wheelchair. While clearly not suitable for highway usage, some variations may be licensed as slow speed vehicles. The catch is that they may on operate on streets, usually a body variation of a neighborhood electric vehicle. A few manufacturers produce specialized chassis for this type of vehicle. Meanwhile, Zap Motors markets a version of the xebra electric tricycle. Which, believe it or not, is able to attain a general license in the United States as a motorcycle.

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

Heavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).

In today's society, there are rules and regulations everywhere you go, the same goes for commercial vehicles. The federal government has strict regulations that must be met, such as how many hours a driver may be on the clock. For example, 11 hours driving /14 hours on-duty followed by 10 hours off, with a max of 70 hours/8 days or 60 hours/7 days. They can also set rules deciding how much rest and sleep time is required, however, these are only a couple of regulations set. Any violations are often subject to harsh penalties. In some cases, there are instruments to track each driver's hours, which are becoming more necessary.