Nicks Moving

USDOT # 58052
3022 Veterans Rd West
Staten Island, NY 10309
Staten Island
New York
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (718) 259-5800
Company Site: www.nicksmovers.com

Moving with Nicks Moving

Nick’s Moving was established in 1946 by Nicholas Albano Sr. Nick started his business with one truck, doing local deliveries for furniture stores in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn, before getting started in household relocations.
The motto was “The bitterness of poor service remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.”
Nick truly believed that treating people’s belongings as if they were his own would be the key to his success.
Through his commitment to excellence and customer satisfaction he built a reputation of honesty and reliability with over 60 years of continued service.
The torch was passed to his son Nicholas Jr., and now to his two son in laws who have been with the company for over 20 years always with the emphasis on customer satisfaction.



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Your Nicks Moving Reviews

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Shockingly, I need to concur with a prior post that Nick's has no respect for client's property. I called a few times about every one of the scratches on my new furniture and they generally gave me the circled or had a faltering reason. After two years, despite everything I get irritated when I see the scratches on a few pieces. They are all daylight and grins toward the starting, however don't remain behind their oath. I would look for other more responsive, respectable organizations.

Did You Know

Question“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

QuestionTrucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

QuestionTrucks and cars have much in commonmechanicallyas well asancestrally.One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were notreallycommon until the mid 1800's. While looking at thispractically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This ismostlydue to the fact that the roads of the timewere builtfor horse and carriages. Steam truckswere leftto very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station.In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton.Steam-powered truckswere soldin France and in the United States,apparentlyuntil the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, theywere knownas 'steam wagons'.

QuestionTrailer stability can be defined as the tendency of a trailer to dissipate side-to-side motion. The initial motion may be caused by aerodynamic forces, such as from a cross wind or a passing vehicle. One common criterion for stability is the center of mass location with respect to the wheels, which can usually be detected by tongue weight. If the center of mass of the trailer is behind its wheels, therefore having a negative tongue weight, the trailer will likely be unstable. Another parameter which is less commonly a factor is the trailer moment of inertia. Even if the center of mass is forward of the wheels, a trailer with a long load, and thus large moment of inertia, may be unstable.

QuestionHeavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).