Donald S. Hubsch Movers

USDOT None
333 4th St
Trenton, NJ 08638
Trenton
New Jersey
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (609) 882-2907
Company Site: www.hubschmoving.com

Moving with Donald S. Hubsch Movers

With more than 80 years of experience, Hubsch Moving and Storage has been proudly providing quality moving services in Trenton, New Jersey, and surrounding areas. We know just how frustrating, time consuming and difficult packing up and moving can be. That's why our professionals are fully trained to handle all of your personal items so that they arrive safely and securely.



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The crew did a great job moving us. Get these guys for your next move you won't regret it!

Did You Know

QuestionThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations.At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States.Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and workingis limited.The FMCSA regulates theminimumamount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

QuestionWith the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media.Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving.He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry.It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamiltoncertainlytakes an interesting perspectivehistoricallyspeaking.

Question1941 was a tough era to live through.Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II.After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'.However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways.With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests.Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

QuestionWords have always had a different meaning or havebeen usedinterchangeablywith others across all cultures.In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" ismostlyreserved for larger vehicles.Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container").The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.