Fast Moving

USDOT # 501800
349 Blau Rd
Hackettstown, NJ 07840
Hackettstown
New Jersey
Contact Phone: (888) 899-6683
Additional Phone: (908) 850-5665
Company Site: www.fastmovingcompany.com

Moving with Fast Moving

You probably expect just moving boxes and tape, moving trucks, and manpower– these are the basics. Every mover can give you the staples for a household move. But what do the best New Jersey movers provide for your move? Your move is not just a collection of boxes and furniture, it’s your life; from family heirlooms and antiques to the latest big-screen TV. And while all these things can be replaced or repaired if needed, the role of your mover is to do everything in their power to make sure that you never get to that point; that’s what your mover should provide. Making sure that you know the value of your move is our goal at Fast Moving Company.




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We've used "Maria" and "Julio's" group at Fast Moving numerous times and have observed them to be proficient, sensible and considerate. No issues whatsover.

Did You Know

QuestionAll cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety.Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emissionrequirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. Thiswas intendedto protect the public from noise health side effects.The loud noise is due to the way trucks contributedisproportionatelyto roadway noise.This isprimarilydue to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

QuestionThe Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency thatis devotedto transportation in the United States.The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel.The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.

QuestionSignage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

QuestionThe Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

Question

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.