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According to the United States Census Bureau , the city has a total area of 16.8 square miles (43.6 km 2 ), of which 15.6 square miles (40.5 km 2 ) is land and 1.2 square miles (3.1 km 2 ), or 7.21%, is water. Portsmouth is drained by Sagamore Creek and the Piscataqua River . The highest point in the city is 110 feet (34 m) above sea level, within Pease International Airport.
The city is crossed by Interstate 95 , U.S. Route 1 , U.S. Route 4 , New Hampshire Route 1A , New Hampshire Route 16 , and New Hampshire Route 33 . Boston is 55 miles (89 km) to the south, Portland, Maine , is 53 miles (85 km) to the northeast, and Dover, New Hampshire , is 13 miles (21 km) to the northwest.
Did You Know

QuestionIn 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker.Apparentlythere seems to be a trend in the 70's tonegativelystigmatize truck drivers.

QuestionTrucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

Question“Writer-director James Mottern said he was influenced by nuanced, beloved movies of the 1970s such as "The Last Detail" and "Five Easy Pieces." Mottern said his female trucker character began with a woman he saw at a Southern California truck stop — a "beautiful woman, bleach blonde ... skin tanned to leather walked like a Teamster, blue eyes.” - Paul Brownfield

QuestionThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation.The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States.The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

QuestionThe 1950's were quite different than the years to come.They were more likely tobe considered"Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers.In these times truck driverswere enviedandwere viewedas an opposition to the book "The Organization Man".Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day.He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers".Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Driversroutinelysabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

QuestionThe 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name.Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground andwas shockedwhen his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute.The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.