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Lebanon is located at 43°38′38″N 72°15′19″W  /  43.64389°N 72.25528°W  / 43.64389; -72.25528 (43.643897, -72.255242).
According to the United States Census Bureau , the city has a total area of 41.4 square miles (107 km 2 ), of which 40.4 sq mi (105 km 2 ) is land and 1.0 sq mi (2.6 km 2 ) is water, comprising 2.39% of the city. The western boundary of Lebanon is the Connecticut River , which is also the state boundary with Vermont . The village of West Lebanon occupies the western part of the city, along the Connecticut River. Downtown Lebanon is 3 miles (5 km) to the east, along the Mascoma River , a tributary of the Connecticut. The city is fully within the Connecticut River watershed . The southern end of Moose Mountain is in the northeast. The highest point in Lebanon is the northern end of Shaker Mountain, at 1,657 feet (505 m) above sea level , on the eastern border of the city.
Did You Know

QuestionDuring the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture.Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they becamenegativelystigmatized.As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers werefrequentlyportrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

QuestionWithin the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial.This ismostlydue to the fact that theyrequirethe building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before.This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those whoare opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land.In addition, the cities thatare bypassedmay also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

QuestionA relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season.It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!


In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

QuestionThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations.At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States.Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and workingis limited.The FMCSA regulates theminimumamount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

QuestionThe American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests.These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement.In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These testsessentiallyled to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress.The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks tobe determined bya bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.